Matthew 1:23

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New Testament Matthew 1

(Textus Receptus, Novum Testamentum, Theodore Beza, 4th folio edition. Geneva. 1598)

(King James Version, Pure Cambridge Edition 1900)

(King James Version 2016 Edition, 2016)

Contents

Interlinear

Commentary

Matthew 1:23 is the twenty-third verse of the first chapter of the Gospel of Matthew in the New Testament. Joseph has just been informed of the nature of Jesus by an angel and in this verse the author of Matthew relates this to a quote from the Old Testament.

In Isaiah 7:14 God was speaking a message through Isaiah that went beyond the political crisis of the eighth century B.C. The LORD was speaking about a miraculous conception of the Messiah, the definitive heir to the throne of David, through the Holy Spirit (Matthew 1:18). This is the way that God chose to be Emmanuel, “God with us.” This is the way Isaiah’s extraordinary prophecies (Isaiah 9, 11) about this future ruler were to be fulfilled. The verse occurs when Judah is under threat from the Syrians. Isaiah promises that God can save Israel from this threat, but that if the Jews continue to sin the Assyrian empire will be the instrument of God's vengeance. Carter believes that Matthew is using this situation as an allegory for the time in which he was writing. Immanuel if followed will lead to salvation from the empire, in Matthew's time the Roman, but if the messiah is rebuffed that same empire will be God's instrument of punishment for the Jewish people as presented by the destruction of the temple in 70 AD.

The readers of Matthew would have been very familiar with Isaiah and would immediately recognize the context of this verse.

a virgin

Matthew 1:23 in the 1568 Bishops' Bible
Matthew 1:23 in the 1568 Bishops' Bible

In Matthew's writing, it is clear that the angel quotes directly from Isaiah 7:14. The Septuagint (LXX - which is most likely Origen's hexapla) later copied the same word as as Matthew originally used. The Hebrew almah as virgin in Isaiah 7:14 is a contextual rendering because of its semantic range, as the verse does call for something unusual in the context, a sign. It is also a vocabulary definition. The Hebrew encyclopedia of Even Shushan says the term almah

"denotes a maiden or a young woman, especially before marriage".

This is because virginity was the condition of marriability, any girl called almah would naturally be understood to be a virgin. The Hebrew word "almah" occurs only seven times in the Old Testament and it is translated as virgin only once in Isaiah 7:14.

Firstly, the corrupt versions mistranslate this verse in several ways. The correct reading is “a virgin”, but other readings include “the virgin” and “a young woman,” creating confusion. Many with an anti KJV bias claim that “a virgin” is an error. The issue here is not of which Greek and Hebrew text is followed, as all read Hebrew הָעַלְמָ֗ה ( hā-‘al-māh) and Greek παρθένος (parthenos) here, but the issue is one of correct translational methodology. Context is the decisive factor for determining the final connotation of any word or phrase, not only the dictionary definition or it's etymology. This is where "literal" or "interlinear" editions sometimes fall short. Etymology, is not always an exact science and should not be used as the solitary deciding factor in definition. Our example here is a classic example of this, as many verses clearly state the Mary was a virgin. See Mary mother of Jesus - Virginity

The correct reading is “a virgin” instead of “the virgin” simply because if “the virgin” is used, then in English it would mean that there was only one virgin in all of Israel at the time of Isaiah's prophecy. The definite article “the” in Greek is not always used the same way we use definite articles in English. In the synoptic gospels where the same event is being told, many times different definite articles are used, and at times in the same event in another synoptic gospel there are none. Part of accurate translation methodology includes adding a definite article when it is not there in the Greek text, and sometimes omit the definite article when it is in the Greek text.

Versions that correctly have “a virgin” 1395 Wycliffe Bible, 1535 Coverdale, 1568 Bishops’ Bible, 1582 Douay-Rheims, 1611 King James Version, 1881 English Revised Version 1901 American Standard Version, New American Standard Bible, World English Bible, 1902 Rotherham’s Emphasized bible, Lamsa’s translation of the Syriac Peshitta, 1994 21st Century King James Version

Translations with the incorrect reading of “the virgin” include the the Geneva bible, New International Version, New King James Version, New American Standard Bible, the Holman Standard, the English Standard Version, and the New English Translation.

Some versions have the young woman or the maiden. The 1969 New Life Bible has “The young woman,” the 1943 Goodspeed’s American Translation has “The maiden.” The Jehovah's Witnesses New World Translation (NWT) has "maiden," instead of “virgin,” in Isaiah 9:7 even though Matthew 1:23 clearly shows that Matthew considered it to read “virgin.” One is left wondering how it be a “sign” when it is a “young woman” conceives! How is that a sign? But if a virgin conceives, that is a sign, and only something God can accomplish by His miraculous power.

Editions of the King James Version

Matthew 1:23 in the 1611 King James Version
Matthew 1:23 in the 1611 King James Version

In the 1611 KJV it reads:

“Behold, a Uirgin shall be with childe, and shall bring foorth a sonne, and they shall call his name Emmanuel, which being interpreted, is, God with vs.)”

The original 1611 has many capitalized words that we no longer capitalize in modern English or in post 1769 KJV editions. In the 1611, in addition to proper nouns, common nouns referring to important persons were often capitalized, after the custom of the times. This is due to the influence of the German language upon English at the time of the publication of the KJV, which still capitalizes a lot of nouns that we do not capitalize in modern English. Thus Virgin was in capital letters, as also was Sonne. Both words are in lower case in modern editions of the KJV:

“Behold, A virgin shall be with child, and shall bring forth a son, and they shall call his name Emmanuel, which being interpreted is, God with us.”

Revised Version

Revised Standard Version

The 1952 creation of the liberal National Council of Churches Revised Standard Version reveals the unbelieving bias of the majority of the translators in Isaiah 7:14:

“Therefore the Lord himself will give you a sign. Behold a young woman shall conceive and bear a son, and shall call his name Immanuel.” (Revised Standard Version)

The KJV says:

“a virgin shall conceive, and bear a son.”

The RSV says:

“a young woman shall conceive and bear a son”

The RSV corrupts doctrine of the virgin birth of Christ in this verse. The word used in the original Hebrew language has long been understood to mean specifically a virgin in this context. Because this verse is mentioned in Matthew 1:23, while the RSV correctly translated the Greek with “Behold, a virgin shall conceive and bear a son,” it completely contradicts Isaiah 7:14 in the same version, and causes either a contradiction, or the impression that Matthew misquoted Isaiah. So by poor translational methodology both the doctrine of the virgin birth and the doctrine of the infallibility of the scripture are undermined. It is a clear example of modern versions questioning the virgin birth of Christ, and attacking the doctrine of the preservation of scripture.

Edward F. Hills

Edward Hills said in his book The King James Version Defended:

In both the R.S.V. and the N.E.B. opposition to the virgin birth of Christ is plainly evident. Thus the N.E.B. calls Mary a girl (Luke 1:27) rather than a virgin, and at Matt. 1:16 the N.E.B. and some editions of the R.S.V. include in a footnote a reading found only in the Sinaitic Syriac manuscript which states that Joseph was the father of Jesus.

they shall call

See Also Καλέω

See Also Scriptures Containing they shall call

Matthew 1:23 in Scrivener's 1880 Appendix at the end of his 1880 Greek New Testament
Matthew 1:23 in Scrivener's 1880 Appendix at the end of his 1880 Greek New Testament
Image:Matthew 1 23 Scrivener 1881.JPG
Matthew 1:23 in Scrivener's 1880 Greek New Testament
Matthew 1:23 in Beza's 1598 Greek New Testament
Matthew 1:23 in Beza's 1598 Greek New Testament

The one alteration textual critics concern themselves with is the phrase "they shall call" is changed to "you shall call." This switches the meaning somewhat from Immanuel being a title proclaimed by the people to a name given by Joseph.

Scrivener

In his 191 list of changes from the Greek of Beza Scrivener mentions that he has changed Beza's 1598 with καλέσεις and replaced it with καλέσουσι, claiming the KJV followed this reading. He has in his list:

23 καλέσουσι] ceteri omnes: καλέσεις Bez. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Erasmus

Matthew 1:23 in Erasmus' In Novum Testamentum Annotationes
Matthew 1:23 in Erasmus' In Novum Testamentum Annotationes

Theodore Beza

Matthew 1:23 in Beza's 1565 Greek New Testament
Matthew 1:23 in Beza's 1565 Greek New Testament
Matthew 1:23 in Beza's 1594 Annotations
Matthew 1:23 in Beza's 1594 Annotations

Beza has καλέσεις while Scrivener has καλέσουσι with Stephanus. Scrivener said:

"Beza’s καλέσεις must be derived from Codex D (Greek, but its Latin version vocabit), which in 1565 had been in his possession about three years." (see III. Passages in which the text of the Authorized Version agrees with that of Stephens (1550) against Beza (1589).)

Beza's καλέσεις means to call or name. Scrivener changed καλέσεις into the impersonal καλέσουσι in an attempt to follow the King James Version's ‘they shall call’ as also read the Geneva ‘they shal cal’ and Bishops' although they follow the different Greek of Stephanus and Scrivener with καλέσουσι, while the King James follows Beza with καλέσεις.

Beza said in his 1556 New Testament:

“Scio in plerisque exemplaribus legi καὶ καλέσουσι, id est ‘et vocabunt’ vel ‘et vocabitur’. Quam etiam lectionem sequitur Iustinus Martyr ... quum annotarit Stephanus noster nonnulla antiqua exemplaria cum Hebraeo consentire, et haec apostrophe prophetae Spiritu Dei correpti, et virginem post tot secula nascituram, quasi praesentem alloquentis, magnam vim habere videatur, sequutus sum in hac re iudicium meum, nulla (ut opinor) sensus iniuria”
I know that in most copies καὶ καλέσουσι is read, that is, 'and they will call', or 'and he [Jesus] will be called', which reading was also followed by Justin Martyr... But as our Stephanus noted that some old copies agree with the Hebrew, and as great force would seem to lie in this apostrophe by the prophet, seized by God's Spirit, in which he addresses himself to the Virgin who would be born so many centuries later as if she were present, I have followed my own judgement in this matter, without — in my opinion — any damage to the meaning.” (Beza’s new Latin translation with the Vulgate and his annotations)

In his 1582 New Testament Beza has:

“Sed praestat receptam lectionem sequi, ut sit apostrophe prophetae Spiritu Dei correpti, et virginem post tot secula nascituram, quasi praesentem, alloquentis. Quod magnam vim habet”
“But it is preferable to follow the received reading, so that it is an apostrophe by the prophet, seized by God’s Spirit, in which he addresses himself to the Virgin who would be born so many centuries later as if she were present, which has great force.”

καλέσεις or καλέσουσι?

Beza has:

καλέσεις ‘thou shalt call,’ - is the indicative active future, 2nd person singular verb, from kaleo.

Scrivener has:

καλέσουσι ‘they shall call,’ is the indicative active future, 3rd person plural verb, from kaleo.

How can Beza's singular reading of καλέσεις reconcile with the plural King James translation of ‘they shall call.’

For example, two verses earlier, Matthew 1:21 has καλέσεις in both Beza and Scrivener and it is translated as the singular ‘thou shalt call.’ If the KJV translators followed the 1598 text of Beza, would this not surely be an example of where they deviated from the text of Beza, giving preference to earlier readings of καλέσουσι?

In the 1611 margin in both Isaiah and Matthew give a key element to this reading.

a virgin…shall call: Or, thou, O virgin, shalt call (Isaiah 7:14)
they shall call his name: Or, his name shall be called (Matthew 1:23)

It must be noted that in the KJV 1611 there are 6,565 marginal notes. These notes refer to different things. Some reveal an alternative reading that was considered by the translators but rejected. Others show where manuscript evidence is lacking. But for many, and I believe Matthew 1:23 is an example of this, the margin is simply a synonymous way of reading the verse, to clear up concepts that are not easy to decipher when looking at the Greek base text and English translation. At times, singular words were mistakenly seen by Scrivener to have been erroneously translated as plural, or Scrivener assumed the translators used an earlier Textus Receptus edition. Matthew 10:10 is a good example of where Scrivener gets it wrong, assuming that the plural staves must be translated from a plural Greek word. So in the Trinitarian Bible Society's printed edition of Scrivener's work, he has the plural ‘Rabdous’, and not the singular ‘Rabdon’. The problem is easily solved in knowing that Jesus was speaking to a plural number of people about a singular item. Much like if I told a crowd of people to switch of their phone, phone is a singular used as a plural here. The Greek ‘Rabdon’, ‘nor staff’, was translated as ‘nor staves’, (in the KJV 2016 ‘nor staffs’) due to this principle. The name Immanuel is not ‘God with me’, but ‘God with us’. Grammatically this is called a collective noun. A collective noun is a noun that can be singular in form whilst referring to a group of people or things.

Some nouns are used only in the singular, even though they end in -s. Some examples include: the names of academic subjects such as classics, economics, mathematics/maths, physics; the physical activities gymnastics and aerobics; the diseases measles and mumps; and the word news etc.

This reveals the key to this scripture. Matthew under the guidance of the Holy Spirit translated the Hebrew words in Isaiah 7:14, written to the virgin: "...Behold, a virgin shall conceive, and bear a son, and shall call his name Immanuel...". This practice reveals to Beza that καλέσεις in verse 21 can also be translated concerning the plural couple, which is clear in the Greek in context, but abundantly clear in English in the inclusion of the plural ‘shall’ upon a singular Greek word. Thus the KJV translators also had no issue with translating the first καλέσεις in verse 21 as thou shalt call and the second as they shall call because each one is translated according to the context and not just the definition. Joseph was also a virgin with child. It seems strange to consider the "thou shalt call" in Matthew 1:21 as not the subject of the "they shall call" in verse 23. Many times it is seen that verse 21 is fulfilled in verse 25. But in context here, it is clear:

21 And she shall bring forth a son, and thou shalt call his name JESUS: for he shall save his people from their sins.
22 Now all this was done, that it might be fulfilled which was spoken of the Lord by the prophet, saying,
23 Behold, a virgin shall be with child, and shall bring forth a son, and they shall call his name Emmanuel, which being interpreted is, God with us.

Jesus = Immanuel. The scripture clearly says that Jesus would save His people form their sins. How are these His people unless it is God Himself with us.

An example is in Numbers 32:38:

And Nebo, and Baalmeon, (their names being changed,) and Shibmah: and gave other names unto the cities which they builded.

It has a footnote:

gave other names unto the cities: Heb. they called by names the names of the cities


An example of καὶ καλέσεις being translated as thou shalt call is:

Luke 1:13 But the angel said unto him, Fear not, Zacharias: for thy prayer is heard; and thy wife Elisabeth shall bear thee a son, and thou shalt call his name John.
"...καὶ καλέσεις τὸ ὄνομα αὐτοῦ Ἰωάννην..." thou shalt call his name John
Luke 1:31 And, behold, thou shalt conceive in thy womb, and bring forth a son, and shalt call his name JESUS
"...καὶ καλέσεις τὸ ὄνομα αὐτοῦ Ἰησοῦν..." (thou) shalt call his name JESUS.

Geneva Study Bible

Behold, a kvirgin shall be with child, and shall bring forth a son, and they shall call his name Emmanuel, which being interpreted is, God with us.
(k) There is an article added in the Hebrew and Greek text, to point out the woman and set her forth plainly: as we would say, the virgin, or a certain virgin. (Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Matthew 1:23". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". )

Comparisons

An interesting question would be, - Is the LXX reading (being the fifth column of Origen's Hexapla), that follows Beza here, an early attestation of the Textus Receptus reading of Beza?

Scrivener
Elzevir
  • 1624 - καλέσουσι
Beza
Stephanus
  • 1550 - καλέσουσιν
Erasmus
Complutensian Polyglot
King James Version
  • 1611 - ‘they shalt call.’
Other English Versions
  • 1395 - ‘thei schulen clep’ (Wycliffe)
  • 1534 - ‘they shall call’ (Tyndale)
  • 1549 - ‘they shall call’ (Matthews)
  • 1560 - ‘they shal cal’ (Geneva)
  • 1568 - ‘they shall call’ (Bishops')

The LXX. renders Isaiah 7:14, this way;

Ἰδοὺ ἡ παρθένος ἐν γαστρὶ λήψεται Υἱὸν, καὶ καλέσεις.

Differences:

καλεσεις το ονομα (you will call his name) — D*,2 itd(c),ff1 copbomss Origen Eusebius
καλεσει το ονομα (he will call his name) — itd*
καλεσουσιν το ονομα (they will call his name) — rell

Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges

23. ἡ παρθένος ἐν γαστρὶ ἕξει. Not a Virgin as A.V. but the Virgin: so also the Hebrew, which differs from this quotation only in having the singular ‘she shall call.’ The citation agrees with the LXX. where however the reading varies between ἕξει and λήψεται and between καλέσεις and καλέσουσιν. See Isaiah 7:14.
The historical crisis was this, Ahaz is alarmed by the threatened invasion of Pekah and Rezin—the confederate kings of Samaria and Damascus. Isaiah reassures Ahaz, who hypocritically refuses to ask for a sign. Yet a sign is given. She, who is now unmarried, shall bear a son, probably a scion of the royal house of David; he shall be called Emmanuel, and before he arrives at years of discretion the deliverance shall come, though a heavier distress is at hand.
The prophecy is distinctly Messianic, but the sign in Isaiah is not concerned with the manner of the child’s birth, but with the name, and the deliverance which should happen in his infancy. Therefore, the weight of the reference is to the name ‘Emmanuel’ and to the true Son of David, whose birth was the sign of His people’s deliverance.
μεθερμηνευόμενον, a late word (Polyb. and Diod. Sic.). Cp. τοὺς καλουμένους ἐξτραορδιναρίους ὃ μεθερμηνευόμενον ἐπιλέκτους δηλοῖ. Polyb. VI. 26. 6. The explanation would not of course appear in the original Aramaic gospel.

(Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges)

Meyer's NT Commentary

Meyer's NT Commentary says:

"...καλέσουσι] they will call. The LXX. incorrectly gives ΚΑΛΈΣΕΙς. The evangelist generalizes the third person singular of the original Hebrew into the plural..."

John Gill

John Gill says here:

"...The difference between Isaiah and Matthew is very inconsiderable, it being in the one "thou shalt call", that is, thou virgin shalt call him by this name; and in the other "they shall call", that is, Joseph, Mary, and others; for, besides that some copies read the text in Matthew χαλεσεις "thou shalt call", the words both in the one and the other may be rendered impersonally, "and shall be called"; and the meaning is, not that he should be commonly known and called by such a name, any more than by any, or all of those mentioned in Isaiah 9:6, but only that he should be so, which is a frequent use of the word..."

Vincent's Word Studies

Vincent's Word Studies says:

They shall call ( καλὲσουσιν )
In Matthew 1:21, it is thou shalt call. The original of Isaiah (Isaiah 7:14) has she shall call; but Matthew generalizes the singular into the plural, and quotes the prophecy in a form suited to its larger and final fulfilment: men shall call his name Immanuel, as they shall come to the practical knowledge that God will indeed dwell with men upon the earth.

John Wesley

Wesley says here:

Thou (namely, his mother) shalt call; but here, They - that is, all his people, shall call - shall acknowledge him to be Emmanuel, God with us. Which being interpreted - This is a clear proof that St. Matthew wrote his Gospel in Greek, and not in Hebrew. Isaiah 7:14 .

John Calvin

Calvin says:

In the words, they shall call, there is a change of the number. But this is not at all at variance with what I have already said. True, the prophet addresses the virgin alone, and therefore uses the second person, Thou shalt call But from the time that this name was published, all the godly have an equal right to make this confession, that God has given himself to us to be enjoyed in Christ.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

The Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary says:

καλέσουσιν] This indefinite plural is surely not without meaning here. Men shall call—i.e. it shall be a name by which He shall be called—one of his appellations. The change of person from καλέσεις, which could not well have been cited here, seems to shew, both that the prophecy had a literal fulfilment at the time, and that it is here quoted in a form suited to its greater and final fulfilment. The Hebrew has קָרָאת, ‘thou shalt call’ (fem.).

Bengel

Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament says:

"...THEY shall call) Both the Hebrew and the LXX. have “Thou shalt call,” i.e., “THOU Virgin-Mother”—“THOU shalt call,” occurs also in Matthew 1:21, addressed to Joseph: whence is now substituted “THEY shall call,” i.e., all, thenceforth. The angel says to Mary, in Luke 1:28, The Lord is with THEE. Not one or the other of His parents however, but all who call upon His name, say, “with us.”—Cf. Luke 1:54.—Those words deserve particular attention in which the writers of the New Testament differ from the LXX., or even from the Hebrew.— τὸ ὄνομα, the name) This does not mean the name actually given at circumcision, but yet the true name (cf. Isaiah 9:5), aye, the proper name too, by which he is called, even by his parents (cf. Isaiah 8:8), and which is even especially proper to Him, inasmuch as it is synonymous with the name Jesus..."

Pett

Petts Commentary of the bible says:

‘They will call.’ When ‘they’ is used as a vague subject, as it is here in Matthew’s version of the quotation, it is a regular Semitic generalisation indicating ‘Many will call Him’. (MT has ‘she will call’. LXX has ‘you will call’).

Benson

Benson's Commentary on the Old and New Testaments says:

They shall call his name — That is, his name shall be called; a personal verb being put for an impersonal, as is frequently the case; or, as some copies read it, Thou shalt call, or, he shall be owned and accounted; Emmanuel, God with us

Geneva Bible

The 1560 Geneva Bible has:

"they shal call", with a marginal note "Or, thou".

Italian Bible

The 1612 Italian bible has:

il qual sarà chiamato - which will be called

Spanish Bible

The 1602 Spanish Bible has

y llamarán su nombre - and they shall call

King James Version

A marginal note in the 1611 King James Version has

they shall call his name: Or, his name shall be called

Immanuel

The “name” Immanuel is moreso a description than a title. Hebrew `Immanuel = God (El) with us (Isaiah 7:14; 8:8) and is another clear proof of His Deity.

In this passage before and after Matthew quotes Isaiah 7:14 concerning the name being “Immanuel” (1:23), he stated that Joseph would call His name Jesus (Verse 21) and then went on to do so (verse 25). So Matthew said His “name” would be “Immanuel” in verse 23, but also said “Jesus” in verses 21 and 25, revealing that Matthew understood the difference between, and the biblical pattern of, descriptive titles and names given to people, being bold to use those references in the same chapter. He had earlier in Matthew 1:16, Matthew said that Jesus would be called Christ, and in 1:1 and 1:20 both Jesus and Joseph are called the son of David. It is of interest that Theos is used of the Son here as in John 1:1; 20:28 , ect. Romans 9:5. 2 Peter 1:1. 1 John 5:20 ). Compare Colossians 2:9 and 2 Peter 1:3, 4.

Isaiah 7:14 gives us the prophecy of the Virgin Birth of Christ and states that His name would be "Immanuel." Matthew 1:23 tells us that this word means "God with us." Jesus is God with us. Some would ask where Jesus was named Immanuel, but one must firstly consider other scriptural references in regard to Jesus' titles.

For example, Isaiah 9:6 says

“For unto us a child is born, unto us a son is given: and the government shall be upon his shoulder: and his name shall be called Wonderful, Counsellor, The mighty God, The everlasting Father, The Prince of Peace.”

Isaiah did not mean that people would address Jesus as “Wonderful Counselor,” or “Everlasting Father” in His earthly years, but rather that these are attributes of the nature of Christ that, although He may now be called, would be more of a description rather than a title.

There are many examples in scripture of descriptive titles given to Jesus that are to do with His nature. An example of Adam doing this is in Genesis Chapter 2 when Adam called Eve a woman:

“And Adam said, This is now bone of my bones, and flesh of my flesh: she shall be called Woman, because she was taken out of Man.” Genesis 2:23

But in the next chapter it says:

“And Adam called his wife’s name Eve; because she was the mother of all living.” Genesis 3:20

By Adam calling her Woman, was reflecting on her nature as female human, but later she would be known as “Eve.”

In Luke 1:28-35, we find more information about what the Angel Gabriel spoke to Mary. Although “Immanuel” was not used, other descriptive names and the titles by which He would be known were mentioned:

And the angel came in unto her, and said, Hail, thou that art highly favoured, the Lord is with thee: blessed art thou among women. And when she saw him, she was troubled at his saying, and cast in her mind what manner of salutation this should be. And the angel said unto her, Fear not, Mary: for thou hast found favour with God. And, behold, thou shalt conceive in thy womb, and bring forth a son, and shalt call his name JESUS. He shall be great, and shall be called the Son of the Highest: and the Lord God shall give unto him the throne of his father David: And he shall reign over the house of Jacob for ever; and of his kingdom there shall be no end. Then said Mary unto the angel, How shall this be, seeing I know not a man? And the angel answered and said unto her, The Holy Ghost shall come upon thee, and the power of the Highest shall overshadow thee: therefore also that holy thing which shall be born of thee shall be called the Son of God. (Luke 1:28-35)

Here we can see many titles for Jesus.

Scrivener on 494

On page 246-246 of "A Plain Introduction to the Criticism of the New Testament" under the chapter "Chapter VIII. Cursive Manuscripts Of The Gospels. Part II." Scrivener writes: 494. Oxf. Ch. Ch. Wake 22 [xiii], 10 × 8, ff. 160 (24, 27), κεφ. t., τίτλ., κεφ., lect., subscr., ἀναγν., in a wretched hand and bad condition, begins Matt. i. 23, ends John xix. 31. Also mut. Matt. v. 26-vi. 23; Luke xxiv. 9-28; John iii. 14-iv. 1; xv. 9-xvi. 6. (Greg. 508.)

Bullinger

Bullinger, in his Companion Bible Appendixes has: 2 The Greek word parthenos, in Matthew 1:23, shows that the 'almah of Isaiah 7:14 must have been a virgin. The Septuagint also renders 'almah by parthenos in Isaiah 7:14.

John Calvin

Calvin said: “Hence arises another proof, that Christ is God manifested in the flesh, (I Tim. iii.16).”(Calvin, vol. 1, 106)

Variants

Codex Bezae has καλεσεις
Codex Bezae has καλεσεις
καλεσεις το ονομα (yousg will call his name) — D*,2 itd(c),ff1 copbomss Origen Eusebius
καλεσει το ονομα (he will call his name) — itd*
καλεσουσιν το ονομα (they will call his name) — rell

Greek

Textus Receptus

See Also Matthew 1:23 Complutensian Polyglot 1514

Desiderius Erasmus

Matthew 1:23 in Erasmus' 1519 Greek New Testament
Matthew 1:23 in Erasmus' 1519 Greek New Testament

Colinæus

Stephanus (Robert Estienne)

Theodore Beza

  • 1565 (Beza 1st)
  • 1565 (Beza Octavo 1st)
  • 1567 (Beza Octavo 2nd)
  • 1580 (Beza Octavo 3rd)
  • 1582 (Beza 2nd)
  • 1589 (Beza 3rd)
  • 1590 (Beza Octavo 4th)
Matthew 1:23 in Beza's 1598 Greek New Testament
Matthew 1:23 in Beza's 1598 Greek New Testament

See Also Matthew 1:23 Beza 1598 (Beza)

  • 1604 (Beza Octavo 5th)

Elzevir

  • 1624 Ἰδού, ἡ παρθένος ἐν γαστρὶ ἕξει, καὶ τέξεται υἱόν, καὶ καλέσουσι τὸ ὄνομα αὐτοῦ ἘΜΜΑΝΟΥΉΛ· ὅ ἐστι μεθερμηνευόμενον· Μεθ’ ἡμῶν ὁ Θεός. (Elzevir)
  • 1633 (Elzevir)
  • 1641 (Elzevir)

Scholz

Scrivener

Other Greek

  • 250 … με̣… (Papyrus 1)
  • 400 Iδου η παρθενος εν γαστρι εξει και τεξεται υιον και καλεσουσιν το ονομα αυτου Eμμανουηλ ο εστιν μεθερμηνευομενον μεθ ημων ο ΘC (Codex Vaticanus) 1209 (B or 03) (von Soden δ1) - Vatican Library (See Also Nomina sacra)
  • 400 Iδου η παρθενος εν γαστρι εξι και τεξετε YN και καλεσουσι- το ονομα αυτου Eμμανουηλ ὁ εστιν μεθερμηνευομενο- μεθʼ ημων ο ΘC (Codex Sinaiticus) Most probably a forgery (א or 01) (von Soden δ2) - British Library Leipzig University Saint Catherine's Monastery (See Also Nomina sacra)
  • 400 - 500 Ϊδου η παρθενος εν γαστρι εξει και τεξεται υϊον και καλεσουσιν το ονομα αυτου Eμμανουηλʼ ο εστιν μεθερμηνευομενον μεθ ημων ο ΘC (Codex Washingtonianus) (W or 032) (von Soden ε014) (See Also Nomina sacra)
  • 450 Iδου η παρθενος εν γαστρι εξει και τεξεται YN και καλεσουσιν το ονομα αυτου Eμμανουηλ ο εστι- μεθερμηνευομενον μεθ ημων ο ΘC · Codex Ephraemi Syri Rescriptus (C04) (5th century)
  • 450 Iδου η παρθενος εν γαστρι εξει και τεξετε υιον και καλεσεις το ονομα αυτου Eμμανουηλ ο εστιν μεθερμηνευομενον μεθ ημων ο ΘC (Codex Bezae Cantabrigiensis (D05) (5th century)
  • 450 Ϊδου η παρθένος εν γαστρι εξει, και τεξεται ΥΝ. και καλέσουσιν το ονομα αυτου Εμμανουηλ· ο εστι- μεθερμηνευομενον, μεθ ημων ο ΘC· Codex Basilensis (Ee or 07) (von Soden ε55) (See Also Nomina sacra)
  • 550 ιδου η παρθενος εν γαστρι εξει και τεξεται υιον και καλεσουσιν το ονομα αυτου Εμμανουηλ ο εστιν μεθερμηνευομενον μεθ ημων ο Θεος· Codex Purpureus Rossanensis (Σ035) (6th century)24-25
  • 550 ιδου η θ παρθενος εν γαστρι εξει και τεξετε ΥΝ και καλεσουσι το ονομα αυτου Εμμανουηλ ο [..]τιν μεθερμηνευομε[…] μεθ ημων ο ΘC Uncial 071
  • 750 Ϊδοὺ ἡ παθρνος ἐν γαστρὶ ἕξη, καὶ τεξετε ΥΝ, καὶ καλέσουσιν τὸ ὄνομα αὐτοῦ Ἐμμανουήλ· ὁ ἐστιν, μεθερμινευόμενον, μεθ’ ἡμῶν ὁ ΘC· Codex Regius (Grec 62) (L019)
  • 850 Ῑδου· η· παρθενος· εν γαστρι· εξει και τεξεται· υν· Και· καλεσουσιν· το· ονομα αυτου· Εμμανουηλ Ο εστιν· μεθερμηνευομενον· μεθ ημων ο· ΘC· Codex Sangallensis 48 (Δ037)
  • 850 ἰδοὺ ἡ παρθένος ἐν γαστρὶ ἕξει· καὶ τέξεται υἱὸν· καὶ καλέσουσι τὸ ὄνομα αὐτοῦ Ἐμμανουὴλ· ὅ ἐστι μεθερμηνευόμενον· μεθ ἡμῶν ὁ ΘC· (Codex Cyprius (Grec 63) (K017)
  • 850 ἰδοὺ ἡ παρθʹνος ἐν γαστρὶ ἔξει· καὶ τέξεται ὑϊὸν· καὶ καλέσουσι τὸ ὄνομα αὐτοῦ ἐμμανουὴλ· ὅ, ἐστὶ μεθερμηνευόμενον, μεθ’ ἡμῶν ὁ θc· Minuscule 9 (Gr. 83) (1167)
  • 1050 ἰδοὺ ἡ παρθένος ἐν γαστρὶ ἕξει· καὶ τέξεται υἱόν. καὶ καλέσουσι τὸ ὄνομα αὐτοῦ ἐμμανουὴλ· ὅ ἐστι μεθἑρμηνευόμενον μεθ’ ἡμῶν ὁ θc. Minuscule 43 (8409)
  • 1050 ἰδοὺ ἡ παρθένος ἐν γαστρὶ ἕξει· καὶ τέξεται ὓν, καὶ καλέσουσι τὸ ὄνομα αὐτοῦ ἐμμανουήλ· ὅ ἐστι μεθερμηνευόμενον, μεθ’ ἡμῶν ὁ θσʹ· Minuscule 8 (Gr. 49)
  • 1150 ἰδού, ἡ παρθένος ἐν γαστρὶ ἕξει· ϗ τέξεται υἱόν. καὶ καλέσουσι τὸ ὄνομα αὐτοῦ Ἐμμανουήλ· ὅ, ἐστι μεθερμηνευόμενον· μεθ’ ἡμῶν ὁ θσ· Minuscule 1
  • 1150 ἰδοὺ ἡ παρθνος ἐν γαστρὶ ἕξει καὶ τέξεται ὑν καὶ καλέσεις τὸ ὄνομα αὐτοῦ ἐμμανουἢλ· ὅ ἐστιν μεθερμηνευόμεν{ον} μεθ’ ἡμῶν ὁ θσ· Minuscule 2
  • 1150 ιδου Η παρθενος εν γαστρι εξει· και τεξεται υν· και καλεσουσι το ονομα αυτου εμμανουηλ· ο εστι μεθερμηνευομενον μεθ ημων ο θc· Minuscule 44
  • 1857 (Tregelles' Greek New Testament)
  • ἰδοὺ ἡ παρθένος ἐν γαστρὶ ἕξει καὶ τέξεται υἱόν, καὶ καλέσουσιν τὸ ὄνομα αὐτοῦ Ἐμμανουήλ, ὅ ἐστιν μεθερμηνευόμενον μεθ’ ἡμῶν ὁ θεός.(Tischendorf 8th Ed.)
  • 1881 Ἰδοὺ ἡ παρθένος ἐν γαστρὶ ἕξει καὶ τέξεται υἱόν, καὶ καλέσουσιν τὸ ὄνομα αὐτοῦ Ἐμμανουήλ· ὅ ἐστιν μεθερμηνευόμενον Μεθ' ἡμῶν ὁ θεός. (Westcott & Hort)
  • (Greek orthodox Church)
  • 1904 Ἰδοὺ ἡ παρθένος ἐν γαστρὶ ἕξει καὶ τέξεται υἱόν, καὶ καλέσουσιν τὸ ὄνομα αὐτοῦ Ἐμμανουήλ, ὅ ἐστιν μεθερμηνευόμενον Μεθ’ ἡμῶν ὁ Θεός. (Nestle Aland)
  • 1904 Ἰδοὺ ἡ παρθένος ἐν γαστρὶ ἕξει καὶ τέξεται υἱόν, καὶ καλέσουσι τὸ ὄνομα αὐτοῦ Ἐμμανουήλ, ὅ ἐστιν μεθερμηνευόμενον Μεθ’ ἡμῶν ὁ Θεός. (Greek Orthodox)

Anglo Saxon Translations

  • 1000 (Anglo-Saxon Gospels Manuscript 140, Corpus Christi College by Aelfric)
  • 1200 (Anglo-Saxon Gospels Hatton Manuscript 38, Bodleian Library by unknown author)

English Translations

  • 1380 (Wyclif's Bible by John Wycliffe)
  • 1395 a virgyn shal haue in wombe, and she schal bere a sone, and thei schulen clepe his name Emanuel, that is to seie, God with vs. (Wyclif's Bible by John Wycliffe)
  • 1534 Beholde a mayde shall be with chylde and shall brynge forthe a sonne and they shall call his name Emanuel which is by interpretacion God with vs. (Tyndale Bible by William Tyndale)
  • 1535 Beholde, a mayde shall be with chylde, and shall brynge forth a sonne, and they shall call his name Emanuel, which is by interpretacion, God wt vs. (Coverdale Bible)
  • 1539 (Great Bible First Edition - Miles Coverdale)
  • 1540 Behold, a mayd shalbe wt chylde, & shall bring forth a sonne, & they shall call his name Emanuel, which yf a man interpret, it is asmoch to say as God with vs. (Great Bible Second Edition - Miles Coverdale)
  • 1549 Bholde a mayde shall be wyth chylde, and shal bringe forth a sonne, and they shall call hys name Emanuell, whyche is by interpretation, God wyth vs. (Matthew's Bible - John Rogers)
  • 1557 (Geneva 1557) by William Whittingham
  • 1560
  • 1568 Behold, a virgin shalbe with childe, and shall bryng foorth a sonne, and they shall call his name Emmanuel, whiche is by interpretation, God with vs.) (Bishop's Bible First Edition)
  • 1572 (Bishop's Bible)
  • 1582 (Rheims 1582)
  • 1587 Behold, a virgine shalbe with childe, and shall beare a sonne, & they shal call his name Emmanuel, which is by interpretation, God with vs. (Geneva Bible) by William Whittingham
  • 1599 (Geneva Bible) by William Whittingham
  • 1611 Behold, a Uirgin shall be with childe, and shall bring foorth a sonne, and they shall call his name Emmanuel, which being interpreted, is, God with vs.) (King James Version)
  • 1729 a virgin shall be with child, and shall bring forth a son, and they shall call his name Emmanuel," that is to say, God our Saviour. (Mace New Testament)
  • 1745 Behold a virgin shall be with child, and shall bring forth a son, and thou shalt call his name Emmanuel, which being interpreted, is, God with us. (Mr. Whiston's Primitive New Testament)
  • 1762 (King James Version)
  • 1769 Behold, a virgin shall be with child, and shall bring forth a son, and they shall call his name Emmanuel, which being interpreted is, God with us. (King James Version - Benjamin Blayney)
  • 1770 "Behold a virgin shall conceive and bear a son, and they shall call his name Emmanuel," which is God with us.) (Worsley Version by John Worsley)
  • 1790 saying, Behold the virgin shall be with child, and bring forth a son, and they shall call his name Emmanuel, which is, being interpreted, God with us.) (Wesley Version by John Wesley)
  • 1795 "A virgin shall be with child and shall bring forth a son, and they shall call his name Immanuel," which is being interpreted, God with us. (A Translation of the New Testament from the Original Greek by Thomas Haweis)
  • 1833 Behold, a virgin shall be with child, and shall bring forth a son, and they shall call his name Emmanuel, which being interpreted is, God with us. (Webster Version - by Noah Webster)
  • 1835 "Behold the virgin shall conceive and bear a so (Living Oracles by Alexander Campbell)
  • 1849 Behold, a virgin shall be with child, and shall bring forth the son, and they shall call his name Amanuel; which is interpreted, With us (is) our Aloha. (Etheridge Translation by John Etheridge)
  • 1850 (King James Version by Committee)
  • 1851 Behold, a virgin will conceive, and will bear a son, and thou shalt call his name Emmanuel, which is interpreted, Our God with us. (Murdock Translation)
  • 1855 Calvin Bible by the Calvin Translation Society
  • 1858 Behold, the virgin shall be with child, and shall bear a son, and they shall call his name Emmanuel; which is interpreted, God is with us. (The New Testament Translated from the Original Greek by Leicester Sawyer)
  • 1865 Lo, the virgin in womb shall have, and shall bear a son, and they shall call the name of him Emmanuel; which is being translated, with us a God.) (The Emphatic Diaglott by Benjamin Wilson)
  • 1865 Behold, the virgin shall be with child, And shall bring forth a son, And they shall call his name Immanuel; which is interpreted, God with us. (The New Testament of Our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ 1865 by American Bible Union)
  • 1869 "Behold, the virgin shall be with child, and shall bear a son, and they shall call his name Immanuel;" that is, when interpreted, God–is with–us. (Noyes Translation by George Noyes)
  • 1873 Behold, a virgin shall be with child, and shall bring forth a son, and they shall call his name Emmanuel, which being interpreted is, God with us. (King James Version) by Frederick Scrivener)
  • 1885 Behold, the virgin shall be with child, and shall bring forth a son, And they shall call his name Immanuel; which is, being interpreted, God with us. (Revised Version also called English Revised Version - Charles Ellicott editor)
  • 1890 Behold, the virgin shall be with child, and shall bring forth a son, and they shall call his name Emmanuel, which is, being interpreted, 'God with us.' (Darby Version 1890 by John Darby)
  • 1898 `Lo, the virgin shall conceive, and she shall bring forth a son, and they shall call his name Emmanuel,' which is, being interpreted `With us `he is' God.' (Young's Literal Translation by Robert Young)
  • 1901 Behold, the virgin shall be with child, and shall bring forth a son, And they shall call his name Immanuel; which is, being interpreted, God with us. (American Standard Version - Philip Schaff)
  • 1902 Lo! a Virgin, shall be with child, and shall bring forth a son,––and they shall call his name Emmanuel; which is, being translated, God with us. (The Emphasised Bible Rotherham Version)
  • 1902 Behold, the virgin shall have gestation and bring forth a son, and they will call his name Emmanuel, which is interpreted, God is with us. (Translation of the New Testament from the Original Greek by William Godbey)
  • 1904 "Behold, the virgin shall be with child, and shall bring forth a Son, and they shall call His name Emmanuel," which is, being interpreted, God with us. (The New Testament: Revised and Translated by Adolphus Worrell)
  • 1904 'Behold! the virgin shall be with child and shall give birth to a son, And they will give him the name Immanuel'—a word which means 'God is with us.' (Twentieth Century New Testament by Ernest Malan and Mary Higgs)
  • 1911 (Syrus Scofield)
  • 1912 (Weymouth New Testament)
  • 1918 Behold, the virgin shall be with child, and shall bear a son, and they shall call his name Immanuel, which is, when translated, God with us. (The New Testament Translated from the Sinaitic Manuscript by Henry Anderson)
  • 1923 (Edgar Goodspeed)
  • 1982 (New King James Version) Copyright © 1982 by Thomas Nelson.
  • 1984 (New International Version)(NIV) Holy Bible, New International Version®, NIV® Copyright © 1973, 1978, 1984, 2011 by Biblica, Inc.®
  • 1995 (New American Standard Bible) NASB (©1995)
  • 1999 (American King James Version)AKJV
  • 2000 (King James 2000 Bible©)
  • 2005 (Today’s New International Version)
  • (BBE)
  • 2009 (Holman Christian Standard Bible)(HCSB) Copyright © 1999, 2000, 2002, 2003, 2009 by Holman Bible Publishers, Nashville Tennessee. All rights reserved.
  • (21st Century King James Version) Copyright © 1994 by Deuel Enterprises, Inc.
  • (Common English Bible) Copyright © 2011 by Common English Bible
  • (GOD’S WORD Translation)(GW) Copyright © 1995 by God's Word to the Nations.
  • (Contemporary English Version)(CEV) Copyright © 1995 by American Bible Society
  • (New Living Translation)(NLT) Holy Bible. New Living Translation copyright© 1996, 2004, 2007, 2013 by Tyndale House Foundation.
  • (Amplified Bible) Copyright © 1954, 1958, 1962, 1964, 1965, 1987 by The Lockman Foundation
  • (The Message) (MSG) Copyright © 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 2000, 2001, 2002 by Eugene H. Peterson
  • (New International Reader's Version) (NIRV) Copyright © 1995, 1996, 1998, 2014 by Biblica, Inc.®.
  • (Wycliffe New Testament)

Foreign Language Versions

See also Bible translations into Afrikaans

Afrikaans

  • 1933 (Ta Biblia Ta Logia - J. D. du Toit, E. E. van Rooyen, J. D. Kestell, H. C. M. Fourie, and BB Keet
  • 1953
  • 1982 Paraphrase - Die Lewende Bybel, Christelike Uitgewersmaatskappy (CUM)
  • 1982 South African Bible Society - E. P. Groenewald, A. H. van Zyl, P. A. Verhoef, J. L. Helberg, and W. Kempen
  • 1983 © Bybelgenootskap van Suid Afrika
  • 2001 The Nuwe Wêreld-vertaling van die Heilige Skrif is an Afrikaans translation of the 1984 English translation of the Bible by the Watchtower Society.
  • 2002 Die Boodskap
  • 2002 DieBybel@Kinders.co.za - Gert Prinsloo, Phil Botha, Willem Boshoff, Hennie Stander, Dirk Human, Stephan Joubert, and Jan van der Watt.
  • 2006 The Nuwe Lewende Vertaling (literally "New Living Translation")
  • 2008 Bybel vir Almal - South African Bible Society, Bart Oberholzer, Bernard Combrink, Hermie van Zyl, Francois Tolmie, Christo van der Merwe, Rocco Hough en Elmine Roux.
  • 2014 Direct Translation, South African Bible Society
  • 2014 Afrikaans Standard Version, CUM Books

Akan

Albabian

Amuzgo de Guerrero

  • 1973 Amuzgo de Guerrero (AMU) Copyright © 1973, 1999 by La Liga Biblica
  • 1999

Armenian

Arabic

  • 1516
  • 1591
  • 1616
  • 1622
  • 1671 Biblia Arabica. de propaganda fide. Arabic and Latin Bible printed in Rome by Abraham Ecchellensis and Louis Maracci
  • هوذا العذراء تحبل وتلد ابنا ويدعون اسمه عمانوئيل الذي تفسيره الله معنا (Arabic Smith & Van Dyke)
  • 1988 Arabic Life Application Bible (ALAB) Copyright © 1988 by Biblica
  • 2009 Arabic Bible: Easy-to-Read Version (ERV-AR) Copyright © 2009 by World Bible Translation Center

Aramaic/Syriac

  • ܕܗܐ ܒܬܘܠܬܐ ܬܒܛܢ ܘܬܐܠܕ ܒܪܐ ܘܢܩܪܘܢ ܫܡܗ ܥܡܢܘܐܝܠ ܕܡܬܬܪܓܡ ܥܡܢ ܐܠܗܢ (Aramaic Peshitta)

Basque

  • 1571 Huná, virginabat içorra içanen da, eta erdiren da seme batez, eta deithuren duté haren icena Emmanuel, cein erran nahi baita hambat nola, Iaincoa gurequin.

Bulgarian

  • 1940 "Ето девицата ще зачне и ще роди син; И ще го нарекат Емануил" (което значи, Бог с нас). (1940 Bulgarian Bible)
  • "Ето девицата ще зачне и ще роди син; И ще го нарекат Емануил" (което значи, Бог с нас). (Матей 1:23) (Bulgarian Bible)

Cherokee

  • 1860 Cherokee New Testament (CHR)

Chinese

Croatian

Czech

Danish

Dutch

Esperanto

Finnish

French

  • Voici, la vierge sera enceinte et enfantera un fils, et on appellera son nom Emmanuel, ce qui, interprété, est: Dieu avec nous. (French Darby)
  • 1744 Voici, la Vierge sera enceinte, et elle enfantera un fils; et on appellera son nom Emmanuël, ce qui signifie, DIEU AVEC NOUS. (Martin 1744)
  • 1744 Voici, la vierge sera enceinte, et elle enfantera un fils, et on le nommera EMMANUEL, ce qui signifie: DIEU AVEC NOUS.

(Ostervald 1744)

German

  • 1545 Siehe, eine Jungfrau wird schwanger sein und einen Sohn gebären, und sie werden seinen Namen Emanuel heißen, das ist verdolmetschet, Gott mit uns. (Luther 1545)
  • 1871 Siehe, die Jungfrau wird schwanger sein und einen Sohn gebären, und sie werden seinen Namen Emmanuel heißen, (Jes. 7,14) was verdolmetscht ist: Gott mit uns. (Elberfelder 1871)
  • 1912 Siehe, eine Jungfrau wird schwanger sein und einen Sohn gebären, und sie werden seinen Namen Immanuel heißen, das ist verdolmetscht: Gott mit uns. (Luther 1912)

Greek

  • 1904 (Greek Orthodox (B. Antoniades))
  • Modern Greek (Trinitarian Bible Society)

Hungarian

Indonesian

Italian

  • 1649 Ecco, la Vergine sarà gravida, e partorirà un figliuolo, il qual sarà chiamato Emmanuele; il che, interpretato, vuol dire: Dio con noi. (Giovanni Diodati Bible 1649)
  • 1927 Ecco, la vergine sarà incinta e partorirà un figliuolo, al quale sarà posto nome Emmanuele, che, interpretato, vuol dire: "Iddio con noi". (Riveduta Bible 1927)

Japanese

Kabyle

Khmer

Latin

Matthew 1:23 in Erasmus' 1519 Latin New Testament
Matthew 1:23 in Erasmus' 1519 Latin New Testament
  • ecce virgo in utero habebit et pariet filium et vocabunt nomen eius Emmanuhel quod est interpretatum Nobiscum Deus Latin Vulgate
  • 1527 (Erasmus 1527)
  • 1527 (Erasmus Vulgate 1527)
  • 1565 (Beza)
  • 1598 Ecce, virgo illa erit gravida, & pariet filium, & vocabis nomē eius Emmanuel: quod est, si interpreteris, Nobiscű Deus.) Beza's Latin Translation (Second Column) (Beza)

Latvian

Maori

Norwegian

Pidgin

  • 1996 (Pidgin King Jems)

Portugese

Potawatomi

  • 1833 (Potawatomi Matthew and Acts)

Romainian

Russian

  • 1876 се, Дева во чреве приимет и родит Сына, и нарекут имя Ему Еммануил, что значит: с нами Бог. Russian Synodal Version
  • Phonetically: Rodoslovie Iisusa Hrista, Syna Davidova, Syna Avraamova.

Sanskrit

Shur

Spanish

See Also Bible translations (Spanish)

  • 1543 (Francisco de Enzinas New Testament)
  • 1556 (Juan Perez de Pineda New Testament and book of Psalms)
  • 1569 (Sagradas Escrituras)
  • 1814 Valera Revision
  • 1817 Valera Revision
  • 1831 Valera Revision
  • 1858 Reina Valera
  • 1862 Valera Revision
  • 1865 Valera Revision (American Bible Society Revisión)
  • 1869 Valera Revision
  • 1909 (Reina-Valera) Antigua Spanish Bible
  • 1960 Versión Reina-Valera (Eugene Nida )
  • 1987 Translation from English. Publisher: Watch Tower Bible and Tract Society.
  • 1994 Nuevo Testamento versión Recobro
  • 1997 (La Biblia de las Américas) (©1997)
  • 1999 Nueva Versión Internacional (NVI)
  • 2002 (1602 Purificada)
  • 2009 Santa Biblia: Reina-Valera
  • 1 (Reina Valera Gómez)

Swahili

  • Bikira atachukua mimba, atamzaa mtoto wa kiume, naye ataitwa Emanueli (maana yake, "Mungu yu pamoja nasi").

Swedish

  • 1917 »Se, jungfrun skall bliva havande och föda en son, och man skall giva honom namnet Emmanuel» (det betyder Gud med oss). (Swedish - Svenska 1917)

Tagalog

  • 1905 Narito, ang dalaga'y magdadalang-tao at manganganak ng isang lalake, At ang pangalang itatawag nila sa kaniya ay Emmanuel; na kung liliwanagin, ay sumasa atin ang Dios. (Ang Dating Biblia 1905)

Thai

(Thai KJV)

Turkish

Ukrainian

Urdu

Vietnamese

  • 1934 Nầy, một gái đồng trinh sẽ chịu thai, và sanh một con trai, Rồi người ta sẽ đặt tên con trai đó là Em-ma-nu-ên; nghĩa là: Ðức Chúa Trời ở cùng chúng ta. (Ma-thi-ô 1:23 Vietnamese Bible) (VIET)

Welsh

See Also

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