Editio Regia

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3rd edition of Estienne's New Testament opened to the beginning of the Gospel of John
3rd edition of Estienne's New Testament opened to the beginning of the Gospel of John
4th edition of New Testament of Robert Estienne
4th edition of New Testament of Robert Estienne

Editio Regia (Royal edition) is the third and the most important edition of the Greek New Testament of Robert Estienne (1503-1559). It is one of the most important printed editions of the Greek New Testament in history, the Textus Receptus. It was named Editio Regia because of the beautiful and elegant Greek font it uses.

It was edited by Estienne (Stephanus is the Latinized version of the French name Estienne) in 1550 at Paris. It is the first Greek Testament that has a critical apparatus. Estienne entered on the margins of the pages variant readings from 15 Greek manuscripts as well as many readings from the Complutensian Polyglot.[1] He designated all these sources by symbols from α' to ις'. The Complutensian Polyglot was signified by α'. The oldest manuscript used in this edition was the Codex Bezae, which had been collated for him, "by friends in Italy" (secundo exemplar vetustissimum in Italia ab amicis collatum). The majority of these manuscripts are held in National Library of France to the present day.

The text of the editions of 1546 and 1549 was a composition of the Complutesian and Erasmian Novum Testamentum. The third edition approaches more closely to the Erasmian fourth and fifth editions. According to John Mill first and second editions differ in 67 places, and the third in 284 places.[2] The third edition became for many people, especially in England, the normative text of the Greek New Testament. The fourth edition used exactly the same text as the third, without a critical apparatus, but the text is divided into numbered verses for the first time in the history of the printed text of Greek New Testament. It was used for the Geneva Bible.

A collation against the first edition of Stephanus, 1546, reveals that in 38 passages the editor here rejected the Complutensian reading in favor of that if Erasmus, whereas the converse occurs only twice. This edition is the important 1550 printing in Paris by Estienne (Robert Stephanus) of the Greek New Testament, based on the final lifetime edition of Erasmus of Rotterdam. This was this printing that Stephanus used to divid e th e text into numbered verses which he first put into print in the 1551 edition. Thes e two Stephanus printings (1550, 1551) were utilized by th e translators of the New Testament for the 1611 King James Bible and became cited as the fundament of the 1633 “Textus Receptus” Greek New Testament printed by the Elzeviers in Amsterdam (DM 4679) – “Est haec ipsa editio ex qua derivatur quem nostri textum receptum vulgo vocant, nomine rei minus bene aptato”.

Contents

Manuscripts and sources used in Editio Regia

In his preface Estienne said that he had used sixteen manuscripts as his sources.[3]

SignNameDateContentInstitution
α' Complutensian Polyglot 16th New Testament
β' Codex Bezae 5th Gospels, Acts University of Cambridge
γ' Minuscule 4 13th Gospels National Library of France
δ' Minuscule 5 13th New Testament (except Rev) National Library of France
ε' Minuscule 6 13th New Testament (except Rev) National Library of France
ς' Minuscule 2817 12th Pauline epistles University of Basel
ζ' Minuscule 8 11th Gospels National Library of France
η' Codex Regius 8th Gospels National Library of France
θ' Minuscule 38 12th New Testament (except Rev) National Library of France
ι' Minuscule 2298 ? 11th Acts, Pauline epistles National Library of France
ια' Unidentified
ιβ' Minuscule 9 1167 Gospels National Library of France
ιγ' Minuscule 393 University of Cambridge, Kk. 6.4 (?)
ιδ' Codex Victorinus, 774 (Minuscule 120)
ιε' Minuscule 237 (?)
ις' Unidentified
 ? Minuscule 42
 ? Minuscule 111

Manuscripts γ', δ', ε', ς', ζ', η', ι', ιε' were taken from the King Henry II's Library (Royal Library of France, now Bibliothèque nationale de France). It was suggested by Wettstein that θ' means Codex Coislinianus (it came to France ca. 1650, and was not available in time of Estienne).

See also

1550 Greek New Testament
1550 Greek New Testament

References

  • 1. T. H. L. Parker, Calvin's New Testament Commentaries, (London: CSM Press, 1971), p. 103.
  • 2. Cited by J. J. Griesbach, Novum Testamentum Graece, vol. 1, Prolegomena, p. XXIII.; F.H. A., Scrivener, A Plain Introduction to the Criticism of the New Testament, Cambridge 1861, pp. 387-388.
  • 3. F. H. A. Scrivener, A Plain Introduction to the Criticism of the New Testament, Cambridge 1861, p. 299.

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