Article: Bible Babel in Job - a comparative study by Will Kinney

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A Comparative Study of Job.


The purpose of this comparative study of the different Bible versions is to show that not all versions say the same things but with slightly different words. If one naively assumes the NKJV has only updated the "archaic words", I suggest they carefully compare word for word the differences found between the Authorized King James Bible and the NKJV. There are literally hundreds of unnecessary word changes that affect and change the meaning found in the KJB. I will only mention a few of them in this ongoing study.


Job 3:8 "Let them curse it that curse the day, who are ready to raise up THEIR MOURNING."


Here is a case where many modern versions have translated a word literally when it should not be literal but figurative. The literal Hebrew word here is Leviathan, and among those versions that have created a contradiction by using the literal sense are the NKJV, NIV, RSV, NASB. The NKJV says: "May those curse it who curse the day, Those who are ready TO AROUSE LEVIATHAN."


The reason this creates a contradiction is because later in Job chapter 41 when God Himself speaks to Job He mentions the literal animal called Leviathan. There God says: "Canst thou draw out leviathan with an hook? or his tongue with a cord which thou lettest down?...Behold, the hope of him is in vain; shall not one be cast down even at the sight of him? NONE IS SO FIERCE THAT DARE STIR HIM UP: who then is able to stand before me?" (Job 41:1, 9-10)


The same Hebrew word is used for "raise up" in Job 3:8, and "stir up" in Job 41:10. We see the contradiction in the NKJV. In Job 3:8 the NKJV says: "those who are ready to AROUSE Leviathan", but in Job 41:10 it says: "No one is so fierce that he would dare STIR HIM UP." God says nobody would dare arouse Leviathan, but the NKJV says there are those who do, and thus creates a contradiction.


The word "leviathan" should be taken in a figurative sense in Job 3:8, because it speaks of the mourning among men that occurs when such an awesome sight is considered. Other commentators and Bible translators agree.


John Gill comments on Job 3:8 "who are ready to raise up their mourning".


"Let them ascribe all dreadful calamities and dismal things unto it, as the source and spring of them; which MAY BE SIGNIFIED by Leviathan (caps are mine), that being a creature most formidable and terrible, of which an account is given in the latter part of this book; but MANY JEWISH WRITERS RENDER IT "mourning," as we do. (caps are mine) See Aben Ezram & Gersom in loc. R. Sol. Urbin. Ohel Moed, fol. 1. 1. Aruch in voce tywl. So the word is used, T. Hieros. Moed Katon, fol. 80. 4.


Agreeing with the King James Bible, "who are ready to raise up their mourning" are the Bishops’ Bible 1568, the Geneva Bible 1599, the Spanish Sagradas Escrituras 1569, the Spanish Reina Valera of 1602 and 1909 (levanter su llanto), the old Italian Diodati 1649 (lamenti), Webster's 1833 translation, the KJV 21st Century version, and the Third Millenium Bible.


The King James translators were well aware that the Hebrew word could have been translated “literally”. Previous English versions like Wycliffe and Coverdale had done so, but I believe they rightly understood the spiritual sense of the passage and translated it accordingly.


Other versions have gone off in different, confusing directions. The Judaica Press Tanach renders this verse as: “May those who curse the day, curse it-THOSE DESTINED TO BE CHILDLESS IN THEIR UNION.”


The Contemporary English Version 1995 says: “LET THOSE WITH MAGIC POWERS place a curse on that day.”


It is absurd for some to insist that a word is limited to only one narrow meaning. I am not using this argument to support the idea that if any meaning can fit, we are free to change the English text and come up with another "reliable translation". I am defending the King James Bible as being without proven error. I firmly believe God in His providence has given us both the correct original language texts and the correct English meaning in all cases, and I would not change a single word.


To illustrate how a single word legitimately has several very different meanings is not at all difficult to do. For example, here in Job the same Hebrew word, barak, is used both for "to bless" Job 1:10, 21; 31:20, and 42:12, and is also translated as "to curse" in Job 1:11, and 2:5, 9.


The word translated as "to sin" in Job 1:5, and 22 (Hebrew # 2398 ghah-tah) is elsewhere translated as "to offend", and also as "to cleanse", to "purify", and to "make reconciliation" - entirely the opposite meanings of the same word.


In Job 24:20 the same word abbir # 47, is translated as "mighty (men)", yet in the NASB, NIV, as well as the KJB this same word is also rendered as "angels", "bulls", "mighty men", "stout hearted", "stubborn minded", "valient", and "stallions". So anyone claiming the "literal" sense should always be employed simply has no real understanding of how languages work; especially when using the literal "raise up leviathan" in Job 3:8 creates a contradiction with what God says in 41:10 about how nobody dares to raise up this Leviathan. The King James Bible is always right.


Job 4:21 "Doth not their EXCELLENCY which is in them go away? They die, even without wisdom."


Man's "excellency" would speak of his physical strength and beauty, his mental abilities and intellectual accomplishments. All passes away with the onslaught of death. This is the reading found in the KJB, NKJV, Jewish 1936 translation by the Hebrew Publishing Company, Geneva Bible, Spanish Reina Valera, Young's, Websters, KJV 21, and the Third Millenium Bible.


However the NASB, NIV, RSV give a very different meaning to this passage. The NASB says: "Is not their TENT-CORD PLUCKED UP WITHIN THEM? They die, yet without wisdom."


Job 5:24 "And thou shalt know that thy tabernacle shall be in peace; and thou shalt visit thy habitation, and SHALT NOT SIN."


The verb used here is the one we mentioned before, # 2398 ghah-tah, which usually is translated as "to sin" or "to offend". In fact, a look at the NASB concordance shows they have translated this word as "to sin" 177 times, but only once as "fear loss" and that is here. The reading of "and shalt not sin", is found in the KJB, KJV 21, TMB, Websters, Young's, Douay, Spanish 1909, Geneva Bible, 1936 Jewish translation, Luther's German, and even the so-called Greek Septuagint. However, the NKJV joins the NIV is saying: "and shall FIND NOTHING MISSING", while the NASB has: "and FEAR NO LOSS."


Need it be pointed out that all these versions have likewise translated this same word as "to sin" many times, and that "and shalt not sin" is not the same meaning as "and find nothing missing"? Who says the NKJV is the same as the KJB but with only the "archaic" language updated?


Job 6:1-2 "But Job answered and said, Oh that my grief were throughly weighed, and my CALAMITY laid in the balance."


"Calamity" is the reading of the RV, ASV, RSV, NRSV, ESV, NKJV, Young's, and the NIV is at least similar with "my misery". This great calamity had occured to Job, but he in no wise had yet acknowledged any sin or iniquity on his part. However only the NASB from at least 1972 to 1977 read: "my INIQUITY laid in the balance." Iniquity is not the same as calamity. But now the 1995 NASB Update has again changed their reading, as they do hundreds of others from one NASB to the next, and now says "calamity".


Job 6:3 "For now it would be heavier than the sand of the sea; therefore my words ARE SWALLOWED UP." In other words, Job could not find words to express the grief and sorrrow he felt. His words were swallowed up, and could not come forth.


"Swallowed up" is the reading of the KJB, Geneva Bible, Webster's, and the Third Millenium Bible. However the NKJV again joins the NASB, NIV, RSV in reading: "therefore my words HAVE BEEN RASH." Now, the word used here for "swallowed up" is # 3886 and is only found twice in the Hebrew text. The other instance is in Obadiah verse 16, where not only does the KJB translate it as "swallow" but so also do the NKJV, NASB, RSV, and the NIV has "to drink"! But here in Job, these modern versions have changed it to "have been rash". Go figure.


Job 6:6 "Can that which is unsavoury be eaten without salt? OR IS THERE ANY TASTE IN THE WHITE OF AN EGG?"


This verse is generally the same in the versions, but there are some notable differences found in the way others have rendered these same words into English. "or is there any taste in the white of an egg" is the reading of the RV, ASV, NKJV, NASB, NIV, TEV, KJV 21, TMB, the Geneva bible, Living Bible, Darby, Lamsa, and the Spanish Reina Valera.


But let’s take a look at what other eminent scholars have come up with while translating the same Hebrew texts.


RSV (Revised Standard Version) 1952, Bible in Basic English “Is there any taste IN THE SLIME OF THE PURSLANE?


NRSV, ESV - 2001 “Is there any taste IN THE JUICE OF THE MALLOW?


Young’s “literal” “Is there ANY SENSE IN THE DRIVEL OF DREAMS?”


Douay-Rheims “OR CAN MAN TASTE THAT WHICH WHEN TASTED BRINGETH DEATH?”


Those who assert that all bibles say the same thing but with different words have not studied the issue very thoroughly.


Job 6:13 "Is not my help in me? and is WISDOM driven quite from me?


Here the word "wisdom" is found in the KJB, ASV, Green's MKJV, TMB, Websters's, and the Hebrew Names Version. However again we have a wide variety of renderings found in many others. The Revised Version says: "and that EFFECTUAL WORKING is driven quite from me", the NKJV joins the NIV and has "SUCCESS is driven from me", though the NKJV translates this same word as wisdom in several other passages, as well as the NIV, NASB. The NASB has "DELIVERANCE is driven from me", and the RSV, ESV say "RESOURCE is driven from me".


Job 6:17 "WHAT TIME THEY WAX WARM, THEY VANISH: when it is hot, they are consumed out of their place."


This is the reading found in the KJB, RV, ASV, Geneva, Young's, TMB, KJV 21, and Webster's. However the NKJV paraphrases as: "When it is warm they cease to flow", while the NASB says: "When they become waterless, they are silent."


Job 6:25 "HOW FORCIBLE ARE RIGHT WORDS! but what doth your arguing reprove?"


"How forcible are right words!" would mean that the right words make a sound argument, but Job reproves his friends for their lack of right words. This is also the reading or meaning found in the RV, ASV, Geneva, Bishops' bible, RSV, NRSV, ESV, NKJV, Young's, Darby, Hebrew Names Version, the Jewish translations of 1917, 1936, Spanish Reina Valera, and others, but the NASB and the NIV give us a contradiction. The NASB says: "HONEST WORDS ARE NOT PAINFUL", while the NIV says the exact opposite with: "HOW PAINFUL ARE HONEST WORDS."


Job 6:27 "Yea, ye OVERWHELM the fatherless, and ye DIG A PIT for your friend."


"Ye OVERWHELM the fatherless" is in the NKJV, Darby, 1936 Jewish translation, Webster's, KJV 21, and the TMB. But the RSV, NASB, NIV say: YOU CAST LOTS FOR the fatherless."


"ye DIG A PIT for your friend" is found in Geneva, 1917 Jewish translation, Darby, Webster's, KJV 21, and TMB. But the NKJV says "you UNDERMINE your friend", while the NASB, NIV say "you BARTER AWAY your friend".


Job 7:1 "Is there not AN APPOINTED TIME to man upon earth?


This verse as well as Job 14:14 ("all the days of my appointed time will I wait, till my change come") teaches that our days are numbered by God. "appointed time" is the reading of the KJB, Geneva Bible, Spanish Reina Valera 1602, 1909, Webster's, KJV 21, and the Third Millenium Bible.


However the NKJV joins the RSV, and NIV with "Is there not a TIME OF HARD SERVICE for man on earth?." Yet the NKJV translates this same word as "appointed time" in Daniel 10:1, though the NIV does not.


Job 7:12 "Am I a sea, or A WHALE, that thou settest a watch over me?"


"Whale" is the reading found in the KJB, Geneva, 1936 Jewish translation, Douay, Diodati, Spanish 1909, Webster, Green's MKJV, and the TMB. But the NKJV says "A SEA SERPENT", while the NASB has "sea monster", and the NIV "a monster of the deep".


Job 7:20 "why hast thou set me as a mark against thee, so that I am a burden TO MYSELF."


This is the reading found in the Jewish translations, RV, ASV, NKJV, and NASB. However the NIV unites with the RSV, ESV, and JW version in rejecting most Hebrew texts and follows the reading found in a few manuscripts and the LXX. The NIV says: "so that I am a burden TO YOU", instead of "to myself". The NIV tells you this in their footnote. The ancient Syriac, which the NIV frequently follows, reads as does the KJB.


The NASB also rejects the Hebrew text at least 40 times, but they don't tell you this in their footnotes. You have to look it up in other versions, like the RSV, ESV, and NIV to find this out. We will encounter some examples of the NASB doing this as well in the book of Job.


For a partial list of the many times the NASB, NIV, RSV, ESV reject the Hebrew Masoretic texts, see my two part article dealing with the Apostacy of the NASB, NIV at:


http://www.geocities.com/brandplucked/NIVapos.html


http://www.geocities.com/brandplucked/NIVapos2.html


Job 9:13 "If God will not withdraw his anger, the PROUD HELPERS do stoop under him."


"the proud helpers" is the reading of the KJB, NKJV, Young's, 1936 Jewish translation, Green's MKJV, Webster's, and the Third Millenium Bible. The Geneva says "the mighty helpers". However the NASB joins the RSV and says: "the helpers OF RAHAB", while the NIV has "the cohorts of Rahab".


Job 9:19 "If I speak of strength, lo, he is strong: and if of judgment, who shall set ME a time to plead?".


The little word "ME" is found in the Hebrew texts and is also the reading of the RV, ASV, NKJV, 1917 and 1936 Jewish translations, Geneva, Young's, Darby, the Bible in Basic English and even the liberal New English Bible.


However the NASB and NIV join the RSV, NRSV, and ESV in rejecting the Hebrew reading of "me" and all but the NASB tell us in their footnote to see the LXX, but that the Hebrew reads "me". The NASB, NIV say: "who can summon HIM?" But if you look it up, not even the LXX reads this way. It says: "who can resist HIS judgment?". What the NASB, NIV have in fact done is to follow the Syriac reading for this verse, rather than the Hebrew or the Greek LXX. Lamsa's translation of the Syriac says: "who can summon him?", just like the RSV, NASB, and NIV.


Job 9:27 "If I say, I will forget my complaint, I WILL LEAVE OFF MY HEAVINESS, AND COMFORT MYSELF."


So read the KJB, Webster's 1833 translation, Green's MKJV, TMB, Spanish Reina Valera, Italian Diodati, and the French Louis Segond. However the NKJV says: "I WILL PUT OFF MY SAD FACE, AND WEAR A SMILE."


Job 9:30-31 "If I wash myself with snow water, and make my hands NEVER SO CLEAN: yet shalt thou plunge me in the ditch, and mine own clothes shall abhor me."


"make my hands NEVER SO CLEAN" is the reading in the KJB, RV, ASV, 1917 Jewish translation, Webster's, Spanish, KJV 21, and TMB. But the NKJV says: "cleanse my hands with SOAP", the NASB has: "cleanse my hands WITH LYE", and the NIV "my hands with WASHING SODA". The Hebrew word used here means "clean" or "pure"; it does not mean soap, lye or washing soda.

Job 10:1 "My SOUL IS WEARY OF my life."


This again is the reading found in the RV, ASV, 1917, 1936 Jewish translations, Young's, Darby, Douay, Spanish, Diodati, Webster's, and the TMB.


However the NKJV again joins the NASB, NIV and says: "MY SOUL LOATHES my life", while the NASB, NIV don't even correctly have "soul" but say: "I loathe my life."


Job 10:15-16 "I am full of CONFUSION; therefore SEE THOU MINE AFFLICTION; FOR IT INCREASETH. Thou huntest me as a fierce lion; and again thou shewest thyself marvellous upon me."


"I am full of confusion" is the reading of the Geneva Bible, Webster's, KJV 21, and the Third Millenium Bible. Matthew Henry comments: "he was full of confusion, not only confusion of face for the disgrace he was brought down to and the censures of his friends, but confusion of spirit; his mind was in a constant hurry, and he was almost distracted."


However the NKJV says: "I am full OF DISGRACE. See my MISERY."


The phrase "see thou mine affliction" is in the imperative or command form in the Hebrew, and is also found in Job 35:5, 40:12. The NKJV at least retains the imperative mood with "See my misery", but the NASB changes this to: "I am sated with disgrace AND CONSCIOUS OF MY MISERY." The NIV is different still with: "I am full of shame AND DROWNED IN MY AFFLICTION."


Job 10:15-16 (continued) "I am full of confusion; therefore see thou mine affliction; FOR IT INCREASETH. Thou huntest me as a fierce lion."


John Gill remarks: "For it increaseth,.... That is, the affliction increaseth; which is a reason why pity should be shown him, seeing his troubles instead of abating were growing upon him; he had as much, or more, than he could well bear, and yet more was added to it."


"For it increaseth" is the reading or meaning found in the KJB, TMB, KJV 21, Webster's, Geneva, Darby, and Young's. However the NKJV says: "See my misery. IF MY HEAD IS EXALTED, you hunt me like a fierce lion." Then in a footnote tells us that the literal reading is "it", not "my head". The NKJV has changed the meaning of the passage and followed the NASB, NIV which read: "If I hold my head high, you stalk me like a lion."


As we progress through this study, the next time you hear someone tell you the NKJV is the same as the KJB but with updated words, you will know for sure that they don't know what they are talking about.


Job 11:3 "Should thy LIES make men hold their peace?"


"Lies" is the reading of the Geneva Bible, 1936 Jewish translation, Green's MKJV, Spanish, KJV 21, and the Third Millenium Bible. Webster's 1833 translation has "falsehoods", yet renders it as "lies" and "liars" in other passages. Darby has "fictions", yet renders it as "liars" and "lies" in other places.


The NKJV shows how eager they are to make changes merely for the sake of change. They have to change enough words to get their copyright and make money. Here in Job 11:3 the NKJV says: "Should your EMPTY TALK make men hold their peace?", but translates this same word as "lies" in Isaiah 16:6 "his LIES shall not make it so", and Jeremiah 48:30 "his LIES shall not so effect it". But in Isaiah 44:25 where the KJB, RV, ASV, RSV, ESV and many others say of God that "He frustrateth the tokens of the LIARS, and maketh diviners mad", the NKJV has " Who frustrates the signs of the BABBLERS", and in Jeremiah 50:36 where the KJB says: "a sword is upon the liars", the NKJV has: "a sword is against the SOOTHSAYERS"! The NKJV renders this same word as - "lies, empty talk, babblers, soothsayers". They are just updating those nasty "archaic" words, don't ya know.


In Job 11:3 instead of "Should thy lies make men hold their peace" the NIV has "your idle talk", while the NASB reads: "Shall your BOASTS silence men?"


Job 11:6 "Know therefore that God EXACTETH OF THEE LESS THAN thine iniquity DESERVETH."


So read the KJB, NKJV, 1917, 1936 Jewish translations, the RV, ASV, RSV, NRSV, ESV, and Douay versions. However the NASB, NIV say: "Know this: God HAS EVEN FORGOTTEN SOME OF YOUR SINS."


Job 11:7 "Canst thou find out the Almighty UNTO PERFECTION?" This question asks if we are able to know all there is to know about God perfectly. Of course, the answer is No, we cannot. This is the reading of the KJB, RV, ASV, Darby, Young, and Geneva Bibles. But again the NKJV joins the RSV, NASB, and NIV and asks: "Can you find out THE LIMITS of the Almighty?" I understand that the infinite God is beyond our complete understanding, but does He have "limits"?


Job 11:12 "For VAIN MAN WOULD BE wise, THOUGH MAN BE BORN LIKE A WILD ASS'S COLT."


"though man be born like a wild ass's colt" is the reading of the RV, ASV, Geneva, Darby, Spanish 1909, Webster's, Green's MKJV, KJV 21, and the TMB.


However the NKJV reads: "For AN EMPTY-HEADED man WILL BE wise WHEN a wild DONKEY'S COLT IS BORN A MAN." This is basically the reading also of the RSV, NASB, NIV.


Maybe Young's "literal" translation can help. Young's says: "An empty man is BOLD, and the colt of a wild ass man is born". No? Then how about Lamsa's translation of the Syriac? It says: "For a pure man inspires courage and a mighty man helps others." Still no good? Shall we try "The Message"? It says: "Hollow men, hollow women, will wise up about the same time mules learn to talk. Reach Out to God." If all bibles say the same thing, then you should have no problem figuring out what God really said. Right?


Job 11:17 "And thine age shall be clearer than noonday; THOU SHALT SHINE FORTH, thou shalt be as the morning."


So read the KJB, Geneva Bible, 1936 Jewish translation, the Spanish Reina Valera 1602, 1909 (resplandecerás), the Italian Diodati (tu risplenderai), Webster's, and the Third Millenium Bible. However the NKJV says: "And your life would be brighter than noonday, THOUGH YOU WERE DARK, you would be like the morning." The NIV has: "Life will be brighter than noonday, AND DARKNESS will become like morning." Young's "literal" translation is interesting. It says: "THOU FLIEST - as the morning thou art."


Job 12:4 Job speaks and says: "I am as one mocked of his NEIGHBOUR, who calleth upon God, and "he" answereth him: the just upright man is laughed to scorn."


The meaning of this verse, as well as the following, are greatly debated. As I understand the King James Bible, which I fully consider to be the final authority of God's true words, it is Job who is like one mocked of his neighbour. Job calls upon God and his neighbour answers him with scorn: it is not God who answers him but his neighbour who answers with scorn. Notice the word "he" in the phrase "and he answereth him" is not capitalized in the KJB. The "he" refers to the neighbour who answers the man who calls upon God. So also read the RV, ASV, NIV, Geneva, and Webster's. The RV, ASV, and Geneva also read "neighbour".


However the NKJV changes the meaning of this verse by reading: "I am one mocked by his FRIENDS, who called on God and "He" (capital H, thus = God) answered him."


Job 12:5 Job continues: "He that is ready to slip with his feet is as a lamp despised in the thought of him that is at ease." This is the reading or meaning found in the Geneva Bible, Darby, Webster, TMB, and the Spanish Reina Valera.


John Wesley comments on the meaning of this verse. "Slip with his feet - And fall into trouble; though he had formerly shone as a lamp, he is then looked upon as a lamp going out, as the snuff of a candle, which we throw to the ground and tread upon; and accordingly is despised in the thought of him that is at ease."


However other versions give a completely different meaning to this verse. The NKJV says: "A lamp is despised in the thought of one who is at ease; It is made ready for those whose feet slip." The NASB, NIV are also completey different. The NIV says: "Men at ease have contempt for misfortune as the fate of those whose feet are slipping."


Job 12:6 This verse also has been given very different meanings in the multitude of conflicting versions. The reading of the KJB, as well as that of the Revised Version, American Standard Version, and both the 1917 and 1936 Jewish translations are the same and so is the sense of the Spanish, Darby, and Young's. The KJB tells of the prosperity of the wicked saying: "The tabernacles of robbers prosper, and they that provoke God are secure; into whose hand God bringeth abundantly." - The phrase "into whose hand" refers to the hand of the robbers who prosper.


However the NKJV changes the meaning slightly by saying: "The tents of robbers prosper, and those who provoke God are secure in what God provides by His hand." - The hand is the hand of God.


But the NIV really changes the meaning by saying: "The tents of marauders are undisturbed, and those who provoke God are secure - THOSE WHO CARRY GOD in their hands." Say what?! The NASB also gives a different meaning but not as wacky as the NIV. It says: "the tents of destroyers prosper, and those who provoke God are secure, whom God BRINGS INTO HIS POWER." Now, tell me again how all versions say the same thing but with different words.


Job 12:23 "He increaseth the nations, and destroyeth them; he enlargeth the nations, AND STRAITENETH THEM AGAIN."


Matthew Henry comments: " He sometimes increases their numbers, and enlarges their bounds, so that they make a figure among the nations and become formidable; but after a while they are destroyed and straitened, made few and poor, cut short and many of them cut off, and so they are rendered despicable among their neighbours, and those that were the head become the tail of the nations."


Agreeing with the KJB either word for word, or in sense, are the ASV, NASB, NIV, NRSV, Young's, Webster's, TMB, and several others. The NIV says: "he enlarges nations, and disperses them ", while Young's has: "he enlargeth the nations and he destroyeth them." However the NKJV says: "He makes nations great, and destroys them; He enlarges nations, AND GUIDES THEM." This is a clear case of Hebrew parallelism, which the NKJV totally misses.


Job 13:12 Job continues to speak to his friends and says: "Your REMEMBRANCES are like unto ashes, your BODIES TO BODIES of clay."


"Your REMEMBRANCES are like unto ashes" is the reading of the 1936 Jewish translation, Geneva Bible, Spanish 1909, Douay, Young's, Webster's, and the KJV 21.


The NKJV says: "Your PLATITUDES are PROVERBS of ashes, your DEFENSES are DEFENSES of clay."


John Gill notes: "Your remembrances are like unto ashes,.... Either of things they put Job in remembrance of, the mementos which they had suggested to him; or the things which they had brought forth out of their memories, the instances they had given of what had been in the world, the arguments, objections, and reasonings, they had made use of in this controversy were of no more moment and importance than ashes, and easily blown away like them."


Again John Gill says: "your bodies to bodies of clay; that is, are like to bodies of clay, to such as are made of clay after the similitude of human bodies; and such are the bodies of men themselves, they are of the earth, earthly, they are houses of clay, which have their foundation in the dust; earthen vessels, and earthly houses of this tabernacle, poor, mean, frail, brittle things, are crushed before the moth, and much more before the Almighty."


Job 13:15 "THOUGH HE SLAY ME, YET WILL I TRUST IN HIM."


So read the KJB, Wycliffe 1395, the Geneva Bible 1599, Bishops's 1568, NKJV, NASB, NIV, Holman Standard, Message, TNIV, NET, Bible in Basic English, Darby, Douay 1950, Lamsa's 1936 translation of the Syriac, the ESV 2004, Spanish Reina Valera 1909, 1960, Las Sagradas Escrituras 1569, Jewish translations of 1917, 1936, Judaica Press Tanach, and the Modern Greek translation of the Old Testament.


However, believe it or not, the Revised Version 1881, ASV 1901, RSV 1952, and the NRSV 1989 say: "SEE, HE WILL KILL ME; I HAVE NO HOPE." - the opposite meaning!


RSV 1952 - "Behold, he will slay me; I have no hope..."


The fictitious LXX further confuses the issue with: "Though the Mighty One should lay hand upon me, FORASMUCH AS HE HAS BEGUN, verily I will speak, and plead before him."


Not to be outdone for novelty, Young's "literal" says: "Lo, He doth slay me -- I wait not!" and Green's goes along with this, saying: "Behold, He will cut me off; I WILL NOT WAIT."


Job 14:3 Here we have another example of where the NASB, and the NIV depart from the Hebrew texts. In the KJB we read: "And dost thou open thine eyes upon such an one, and bringest ME into judgment with thee?"


"And bringest ME into judgment" is the reading of not only the KJB but also of the NKJV, RV, ASV, RSV, NRSV, ESV, 1917, 1936 Jewish translations, Young's, Darby, and the Hebrew Names Version. However the NASB and the NIV both say: "Do you fix your eye on such a one? Will you bring HIM before you for judgment?" The NASB never tells you when they reject the Hebrew texts, but the NIV does footnote that the Hebrew reads "me", while the LXX, Syriac and Vulgate read "him". The NKJV for some reason also mentions this fact.


Job 14:3 Here we have another example of where the NASB, and the NIV depart from the Hebrew texts. In the KJB we read: "And dost thou open thine eyes upon such an one, and bringest ME into judgment with thee?"


"And bringest ME into judgment" is the reading of not only the KJB but also of the Geneva bible, Bishops' bible, Coverdale, the NKJV, RV, ASV, RSV, NRSV, ESV, the Holman Standard, the 1917, 1936 Jewish translations, the Judaica Press Tanach, Young's, Darby, and the Hebrew Names Version. However the RSV, NASB and the NIV say: "Do you fix your eye on such a one? Will you bring HIM before you for judgment?" The NASB never tells you when they reject the Hebrew texts, but the NIV does footnote that the Hebrew reads "me", while the LXX, Syriac and Vulgate read "him". The NKJV for some reason also mentions this fact.


Job 14:16-17 Here the NKJV actually gives the opposite meaning to that found in the KJB.


The KJB has Job saying: "For now thou numberest my steps: DOST THOU NOT WATCH OVER MY SIN? My transgression is sealed up in a bag, and THOU SEWEST UP mine iniquity."


Matthew Henry comments: "For now thou seemest to me to number my steps, and watch over my sin, and seal it up in a bag, as bills of indictment are kept safely, to be produced against the prisoner.?


The rhetorical question found in the KJB "Dost thou not watch over my sin?" is the reading found in the RV, ASV, Green's MKJV, TMB, Hebrew Names Version, Webster, and Darby. It means simply that God is watching every move Job makes and keeping a growing account of his sins.


But the NKJV joins the RSV, NASB, NIV and makes it say the opposite with: "You number my steps BUT DO NOT WATCH OVER MY SIN."


Then in verse 16 the NKJV again says the opposite of the KJB. In the KJB, as well as Young's, Webster's, TMB, KJV 21 we read: "My transgression is sealed up in a bag, and THOU SEWEST UP mine iniquity." In other words, it seems to Job that God is keeping track of all Job's sins only to call them up later before him. Even the NASB says God "wraps up" his iniquity. However the NKJV joins the NIV and says: "My transgression is sealed up in a bag, and You COVER my iniquity." Now usually the phrase "to cover my sins" would mean to do away with them and forgive them; so the NKJV gives the opposite impression to the meaning found in the KJB.


Job 15:11 "Are the consolations of God small with thee? is there ANY SECRET THING with thee?


Agreeing with the "any secret thing" are the Amplified Version, Webster's translation, the Spanish Reina Valera of 1909 (cosa oculta), the Italian Diodati, KJV 21, and the Third Millenium Bible. Even the 1970 New English Bible basically agrees with the KJB by saying: "a word whispered quietly", which in effect would be a secret.


However the NKJV agrees rather with the NASB, NIV and gives a totally false footnote, as it often does, in an attempt to slander the King James reading. We will see the same thing again in Job 16:14. The NKJV says: "Are the consolations of God too small for you, AND THE WORD SPOKEN GENTLY WITH YOU?" Then in a footnote says: "Septuagint reads a secret thing." This footnote has two big problems with it. It implies that the Hebrew text cannot possibly have the meaning the KJB assigns to it, which is false. And most importantly, it is a huge lie. The Greek Septuagint version I have gives a completely different reading than the Hebrew text and says nothing at all about "a secret thing". The LXX actually says: "Thou hast been scourged for but few of thy sins. Thou hast spoken haughtily and extravagantly." (megalws huperballontws lelalnka) - absolutely nothing about "a secret thing." The NKJV footnote is an outright lie.


Job 15:23 "He wandereth abroad FOR BREAD, SAYING WHERE IS IT? he knoweth that the day of darkness is ready at his hand."


This verse reads the same in the Jewish translations, based of course on the Hebrew texts. It is also the reading of the RV, ASV, NASB, NKJV, RSV, NRSV, and ESV. The NIV, however, goes totally off the wall here and doesn't even tell you in their footnotes how they came up with their unique reading. The NIV says: "He wanders about - FOOD FOR VULTURES." You have to do a bit of research, but this corrupt reading comes from the Greek Septuagint; not the Hebrew texts.


Job 16:14 Job speaks and says of God: "He breaketh me with BREACH upon BREACH, he runneth upon me like a GIANT."


The NKJV again gives a misleading footnote, as it did in Job 15:11. The NKJV joins the RSV, NASB, NIV in saying "He runs at me like a WARRIOR." Then in a footnote says: "Vulgate reads giant", again implying that the KJB resorted to the Latin Vulgate reading rather than the Hebrew texts. Not only does the KJB read GIANT but so also do the 1917 Jewish Publication Society of America version, the Revised Version, the ASV, Geneva Bible, Spanish Reina Valera, Lamsa's translation of the Syriac Peshitta, Douay, Webster's, and the Third Millenium Bible.


Besides this, the NKJV wrongly translates this verse as: "He breaks me with WOUND upon WOUND; He runs upon me like a warrior." The word is "breach", not "wound", and even the NKJV translates this word as "breach" in Genesis 38:29; Ps. 106:23; Isaiah


Job 17:1 "MY BREATH IS CORRUPT, my days are extinct, the graves are ready for me."


"My breath is corrupt" is the reading of the KJB, Geneva, Darby, 1936 Jewish translation, Spanish Reina Valera 1909 (mi aliento esta corrompido), and Webster's 1833 translation.


John Gill remarks: " My breath is corrupt,.... Through the force of his disease, which made it have an ill smell, so that it was strange and disagreeable to his wife (Job 19:17 "My breath is strange to my wife")


But instead of "my breath is corrupt" the NKJV joins the RSV, NIV, NASB in saying: "MY SPIRIT IS BROKEN"


Job 17: 5 "HE THAT SPEAKETH FLATTERY TO HIS FRIENDS, even the eyes of his children shall fail."


"He that speaketh flattery to his friends" is the reading of the KJB, NKJV, Geneva Bible, 1936 Jewish translation, Webster's, and the Third Millenium Bible. However the NIV says: "IF A MAN DENOUNCES HIS FRIENDS FOR REWARD, the eyes of his children will fail." The NASB is similar to the NIV.


Job 17:6 The meaning of this verse is totallly changed in the NKJV. In the KJB, as well as the Geneva, Spanish Reina Valera (y delante de ellos he sido como tamboril", the Italian Diodati 1649, Webster's, KJV 21, and Third Millenium Bible 1998 we read: "He hath made me a byword of the people; AND AFORETIME I WAS AS A TABRET."


The Judaica Press Tanach is similar to the KJB saying: "and I will be [like] a drum before them."


Bishops' Bible read: "whereas before I was their joy."


The meaning is that formerly Job was considered a leader among the people. A tabret is a small drum, and others would have, in effect, marched to the tune Job played for them. But now God has made him a byword among the people who now mocked him.


Apparently each man feels free to play with the Hebrew text. Adam Clarke comes up with something no one else has. He says: "Instead of lephanim, I would read liphneghem, and then the clause might be translated thus: I SHALL BE AS A FURNACE, OR A CONSUMING FIRE (Topheth) BEFORE THEM."


Young's "literal" translation reads differently than them all with: "and a wonder before them I am."


The New English Bible 1970 renders the passage as: "A PORTENT FOR ALL TO SEE."


John Gill comments on the passage, and you can also read his additional comments to see how some people come up with at least four wildly different translations of the text. But he starts off saying: "and aforetime I was as a tabret - the delight of the people, who, when he appeared in the public streets, came out and went before him, singing, and dancing, and beating on tabrets, and such like musical instruments, to express their joy upon the sight of him; but now it was otherwise with him, and he whom they could not sufficiently extol and commend, now knew not well what to say bad enough of him; such a change in the sentiments and conduct of men must needs be very chagrining." This is the meaning found in the King James Bible and others.


However the NKJV again joins the RSV, NASB, NIV in saying: "But He has made me a byword of the people, AND I HAVE BECOME ONE IN WHOSE FACE MEN SPIT."


This totally changes the meaning. The word "tabret" #8611 is found only once in the Hebrew text, and, according to Wigram's Hebrew Concordance, comes from the verb #8606 which is found only twice. In Psalms 68:25 we read of "the damsels PLAYING WITH TIMBRELS", and in Nahum 2:7 of those "TABORING upon their breasts" or beating like a drum upon their breasts. The word for "aforetime" is # 6440 and has many meanings, including "face" but both the NKJV and the NASB and all other versions also translate this word as "aforetime", "previously", "before" or "formerly" - See Job 3:24 "my sighing cometh BEFORE I eat", and Nehemiah 13:5 (aforetime) and 1 Chron. 9:20 (in time past) for examples. It should be obvious that "and aforetime I was as a tabret" does not mean the same things as "I have become one in whose face men spit."


Job 18 The New KJV is often radically different in meaning than the King James Holy Bible. I have by no means been showing all the differences that exist between these two versions. Most Christians assume the NKJV is just like the old KJB but with a few "archaic words" updated to "modern English", but such is not the case at all. I will focus more on these differences in this chapter than in most by way of example.


Here are some of the word changes in this chapter, not all of them, that the NKJV makes in its "updated" translation. First I will list the words found in the King James Bible and next to them the words found in the NKJV.


Job 18:2 "MARK" (i.e. "take notice") changed to "GAIN UNDERSTANDING."


Job 18:3 "and REPUTED VILE in your sight" changed to "and REGARDED AS STUPID in your sight"


Job 18:5 "The light of the wicked SHALL BE PUT OUT, and the SPARK of his fire SHALL not shine" changed to " The light of the wicked INDEED GOES OUT, and the FLAME of his fire DOES not shine."


Job 18:7 "The steps of his strength shall be STRAITENED" changed to "shall be SHORTENED"


Job 18:9 "The GIN shall take him by the heel, and THE ROBBER SHALL PREVAIL AGAINST him." changed to "The NET takes him by the heel, and A SNARE LAYS HOLD OF him."


Job 18:10 "snare" and "in the way" changed to "a noose" and "in the road"


Job 18:13 "It devours THE STRENGTH of his skin, even the firstborn of death shall devour HIS STRENGTH." changed to "It devours PATCHES of his skin, the firstborn of death devours his LIMBS."


Job 18:14 "HIS CONFIDENCE shall be rooted out of his TABERNACLE, and IT SHALL BRING HIM TO the king of terrors." changed to "HE is uprooted FROM THE SHELTER of his TENT, and THEY PARADE HIM BEFORE the king of terrors."


Job 18:16 "His roots SHALL BE dried UP BENEATH, and above SHALL his branch BE CUT OFF." changed to "His roots ARE dried OUT BELOW, and his branch WITHERS above."


Job 18:17 HIS REMEMBRANCE shall perish from the earth, and he shall have no name IN THE STREET." changed to "THE MEMORY OF HIM perishes from the earth, and he has no name AMONG THE RENOWNED."


I'll make a couple of comments on these last two verses of 17 and 20. In 17 the phrase "he shall have no name IN THE STREET" is the reading found in the KJB, RV, ASV, RSV, NRSV, ESV, HNV, Geneva, Young's, Spanish, and Douay, and others. The NKJV has changed this to "among the renowned", yet has translated this same word as "street" numerous times, as in Job 31:32. The NASB says: "he shall have no name ABROAD", yet their concordance shows they translate this word as "street" 50 times. Likewise the NIV says: "he has no name in THE LAND", and the NIV concordance shows they translate this word as "street" 51 times, and as "land" only once.


Job 18:20 "THEY THAT COME AFTER HIM shall be astonied at his day, as THEY THAT WENT BEFORE were affrighted."


This is also the reading of the RV, ASV, Darby, Green's interlinear, Webster's, TMB, Spanish 1909, 1936 Jewish translation, and the Hebrew Names Version. However the NKJV again joins the RSV, NASB, NIV and says: "THOSE IN THE WEST are astonished at his day, as THOSE IN THE EAST are frightened." Yet the NKJV translates these same words as "those that come after" in Ecclesiastes 4:16, instead of "those in the west".


Don't be tricked into thinking the NKJV is just like the KJB, but modernized. It is not. They have to change a certain percentage of the words in order to get a copyright and make money. Accuracy or consistency of translation is not their main concern.


Job 19:17 Job continues his complaint saying: "My breath is strange to my wife, THOUGH I INTREATED FOR THE CHILDREN'S SAKE OF MINE OWN BODY."


This is either the word for word translation or the meaning found in the NKJV, Revised Version, American Standard Version, Geneva Bible, Webster's, 1936 Jewish translation, Spanish Reina Valera, Lamsa's translation of the Syriac, Douay, and the Third Millenium Bible.


However, the RSV, NASB, NIV, ESV all give a totally different meaning to this verse. The NASB, NIV say: "My breath is offensive to my wife, AND I AM LOATHSOME TO MY OWN BROTHERS." Remember the introduction to the NASB tells us how great and accurate the ASV was, yet it agrees with the KJB. So why did they so drastically change it? Well, you've got to sell bibles and if they are all the same, then why buy a different one? More on the ever changing NASB in just a moment when we get to Job 19:26.


A simple look at the NASB concordance shows that the word used here is # 2603 ghah-nan, and 80 times they translated it as "to make supplication, to plead, to be gracious, to implore", and only one time as "to be loathsome"!! A couple other versions are not of any help either, for they give yet a different meaning to the verse. Young's "literal" translation says: "My spirit is strange to my wife, And my favours to the sons of my [mother's] womb." While the Greek LXX says: "And I besought my wife and earnestly intreated the sons of my concubine."


Job 19:25-26 "For I know that my Redeemer liveth, and that he shall stand at the later day upon the earth; and though after my skin worms destroy this body, yet IN MY FLESH shall I see God.


Obviously this beautiful verse speaks of the resurrection of the body. IN MY FLESH refers to this new body, and is the reading of the NIV, NKJV, Geneva Bible, and the NRSV. However, believe it or not, the ASV, RSV and the NASB 1972 and 1973 editions say: "yet WITHOUT MY FLESH, shall I see God"!! But then in 1977 the NASB again changed their reading to "yet FROM MY FLESH shall I see God."


Job 19:27 "Whom I shall se for myself, and mine eyes shall behold, and not another; THOUGH MY REINS BE CONSUMED WITHIN ME."


The word is literally "kidneys" or "reins" and means the seat of affections and emotions. It is not archaic and is found in the RV, Young's, Darby, 1936 Jewish translation, and Third Millenium Bible. "CONSUMED WITHIN ME" is the reading of the RV, ASV, Darby, Young's, TMB and several others.


Matthew Henry comments This body which we now take such care about, and make such provision for, will in a little time be destroyed. Even my reins (says Job) shall be consumed within me (v. 27); the innermost part of the body, which perhaps putrefies first.


However the NKJV sides with the NIV and again changes the meaning of the KJB by saying: "and my eyes shall behold and not another. HOW MY HEART YEARNS within me." The NKJV has changed the idea from the dissolution of the inner workings of the seat of emotions, to a desire for the resurrection to happen. The NKJV has frequently translated this verb as "consume" but only once as to "yearn". The NASB gives yet a different meaning with: "My heart faints within me".


Job 19:28 Here Job says to his friends: "But ye should say, Why persecute we him, seeing the root of the matter is found in ME?"


There is much variety of opinion as to what this verse means, but my present understanding is that Job had just said things like: "These ten times ye have reproached me...And be it indeed that I have erred, mine error remaineth with myself....Why do you persecute me as God?....But ye should say, Why persecute we him, seeing the root of the matter is found in ME? Be ye afraid of the sword: for wrath bringeth punishments of the sword, that ye may know there is a judgment." Job 19:3,4, 22,28-29.


I think what he is saying in effect is that each of his friends should recognize that they too are sinners, and deserving of the judgment of God that they think Job is rightfully receiving - "the root of the matter is found in ME". Essentially, this is much like what our Lord said in Matthew 7:4 "Or how wilt thou say to thy brother, Let me pull out the mote out of thine eye, but considerest not the beam that is in thine own eye?"


In any event, the Masoretic Hebrew text reads "the root of the matter is found in ME", and so read the Revised Version, American Standard Version, the Jewish translations of 1917, 1936, the Complete Jewish Bible, the Judaica Press Tanach, Hebrew Names Version, the Geneva Bible, Bishops' bible, the NKJV, Rotherham's Emphasized Bible, Darby, Young's, KJV 21st Century, Green's Modern KJV, and the Third Millenium Bible.


Likewise the Spanish Reina Valera also reads as does the KJB saying: "Mas debierais decir: ¿Por qué lo perseguimos? Ya que la raíz del negocio EN MI se halla."


However beginning with the liberal RSV and now found in many other modern English versions is the reading: "'The root of the matter is found in HIM." (not ME). So read the NRSV, ESV, Holman Standard.


The NIV has: ""If you say, 'How we will hound him, since the root of the trouble lies in HIM,"; then it footnotes: "Many Hebrew manuscripts, Septuagint and Vulgate; MOST Hebrew manuscripts ME."


Daniel Wallace's ever changing NET version reads: "If you say, ‘How we will pursue him, since the root of the trouble is found in him!". Then he footnotes "The MT reads “in me.”, but he goes on to tell us that over 100 mss. read "in him", and that the verse is hard to understand.


Not to be outdone, the NASB alone comes up with a unique reading not found in any manuscripts I am aware of. It says: ""If you say, `How shall we persecute him?' And `WHAT PRETEXT FOR A CASE AGAINST HIM CAN WE FIND?"


Lamsa's 1936 translation of the Syriac further adds to the total confusion saying: "For you will say, Why did we persecute him? For a good report will follow me and vindicate me. "


If you are relying on the capriciousness of "the scholars" to give you a perfect Bible, forget about it. It's not going to happen this way.


Job 20:2 Zophar answers Job and says: "Therefore do my THOUGHTS cause me to answer, AND FOR THIS I MAKE HASTE." He simply says he has something to say and he hastens to say it. This is the reading of Geneva Bible, RV, ASV, Darby, Spanish, RSV, Hebrew Names Version, Webster's, and the TMB.


John Gill comments: "he seems desirous of having it understood that his answer proceeded from thought; that he did not speak without thinking, but had well weighed things in his mind; and what he was about to say was the fruit of close thinking and mature deliberation: "and for this I make haste" - because his thoughts crowded in upon him, he had a fulness of matter, an impulse of mind, promptitude and readiness to speak on this occasion, and for fear of losing what was suggested to him, he made haste to give in his answer, perhaps observing some other of his friends rising up before him."


But again the NKJV changes the meaning by saying: "Therefore my ANXIOUS THOUGHTS make me answer, BECAUSE OF THE TURMOIL within me." The NKJV has frequently translated this same word as "haste" or "hasten", yet only once as "turmoil". The NASB, NIV give a similar sense to the NKJV, thus departing from the previous English versions.


Job 20:3 "I have heard THE CHECK OF MY REPROACH, and the spirit of my understanding causeth me to answer."


Commentators as well as versions differ radically over what this phrase means and how to render it. For me, the meaning is clear in the King James Bible. Zophar had previously reproached Job in chapter 11 for what he considered to be Job's lies and iniquity, and Job in turn had rebuffed Zophar's reproach. A check is defined as a stop or a restraint. In other words Job had moved to stop the reproach made by Zophar against him.


Webster's translation, the Geneva Bible and the Spanish Reina Valera agree with the KJB. The Third Millenium Bible says essentially the same with "I have heard the rebuke of my reproach." However the NKJV joins with the NIV in making a verb out of a noun and changes the meaning by saying: "I have heard THE REPROOF THAT REPROACHES ME."


Job 20:6 "Though HIS EXCELLENCY mount up to the heavens, and his head reach unto the clouds; Yet he shall perish for ever like his own DUNG."


This is the reading found in the RV, 1917, 1936 Jewish translations, Young's, Geneva, Lamsa, Webster, TMB, and others. Man's excellency would speak of his great accomplishments both materially and intellectually. The NASB says: "his loftiness". But the NKJV says: "Though HIS HAUGHTINESS mounts up to the heavens, yet he will perish for ever like his own REFUSE."


The word "dung" is obviously not archaic and is even found here in the NIV, but the NKJV calls it "refuse". Refuse is just trash in general, but dung is specifically quite another thing, and this is what God said. The same word is used in Ezekiel 4:12, 15 where God told the prophet to bake his food with cow's dung.


Job 20:17 "He shall not see the rivers, the floods, the brooks of honey and BUTTER." Butter is the reading of the RV, ASV, Darby, Geneva, Spanish 1909, Hebrew Names Version, TMB, and several others. The word is found 10 times in Hebrew and is always translated as "butter" in the KJB. However the NKJV joins the NIV here and says "with honey and CREAM." The NASB says CURDS. However when we consult their concordances we see that the NKJV correctly has "butter" in Gen. 18:8, and Proverbs 30:33, but also "curds" in Isaiah 7:15, 22. Butter, curds, cream - Hey, it's all the same thing, right? So which do you put on your toast? The NASB has "curds" twice and "butter" 8 times, while the NIV diversifies even more with "cream" twice, "curds" 6 times, "butter" once, and "curdled milk" once, for good measure.


Job 20:22 "In the fulness of his sufficiency he shall be in straits; every hand OF THE WICKED shall come upon him."


This word is related to a word that has many meanings, as most words do. The word can mean "wicked, mischief, trouble, pain, labour, or misery". Every "hand of the wicked" is the reading of the Geneva Bible, Lamsa, Spanish, Webster, KJV 21, TMB, and Young's. But again the NKJV changes the meaning and joins the NASB, NIV by saying: "every hand OF MISERY will come against him."


Job 21:4 Job continues: "As for me, is my complaint to man? and if it were so, why should not MY SPIRIT BE TROUBLED?".


The word used here is clearly "my spirit" and is even so translated by the NKJV in Job 6:4; 7:11, and 10:12, but here the NKJV joins the NASB, NIV again and says: "why should I NOT BE IMPATIENT?". Even the NKJV elsewhere translates this word as "his soul was VEXED" (Judges 16:16), and "the soul of the people was DISCOURAGED" (Num. 21:4), but here follows the NASB, NIV instead. The reading of "my spirit be troubled" is found in the Geneva Bible, 1936 Jewish translation, Lamsa, Webster's, TMB, and the Spanish.


Job 21:23-24 "One dieth in his full strength, being wholly at ease and quiet. His BREASTS are full of MILK, and his bones are moistened with marrow."


The expression "his breasts are full of milk" is poetic and expresses general good health. Matthew Henry comments: "his breasts are full of milk and his bones moistened with marrow (v. 24), that is, he is healthful and vigorous, and of a good constitution (like a milch cow that is fat and in good liking), he counts upon nothing but to live many years in mirth and pleasure. Thus fair does he bid for life, and yet he is cut off in a moment by the stroke of death."


"His breasts are full of milk" is the reading of the Bishops’ Bible, the Geneva Bible, Revised Version, Young's, 1936 Jewish translation, and Webster's.


However the NKJV, ASV say: "His PAILS are full of milk", the NASB, Darby say: "His SIDES are filled out with FAT", and the NIV has: "His BODY WELL NOURISHED". The word is "milk" and is used in the expression 'the land of milk and honey'. Holman Standard - “His body is well-fed.” Green’s ‘literal’ - “His SIDES are full of milk” (Say what?!); RSV - “His BODY full of fat” (there is a lot of that going around today); NRSV - “His LOINS full of milk” and then the revision of the revision of the revision, the ESV has not gone back to the old ASV reading of “His PAILS are full of milk”. Rotherham’s 1902 Emphasized bible has: “His VEINS are filled with nourishment”; the New Living Translation has: “the very picture of health” and Petersons The Message is super hip and simply reads: “FAT AND SASSY”


The Hebrew word is very common, #2461 "milk", and is used in the expression 'the land of milk and honey'.




Job 21:32 "Yet shall he be brought down to the grave, and SHALL REMAIN in the tomb." So read the Geneva Bible, 1936 translation, Spanish Reina Valera 1909, Webster's, and the Third Millenium Bible. But again the NKJV joins the NASB, NIV and says: "Yet he shall be brought to the grave, and A VIGIL KEPT OVER the tomb."


Job 22:4 Eliphaz asks Job: "WILL HE REPROVE THEE FOR FEAR OF THEE? Will he enter with thee into judgment?"


This is the reading of the KJB, 1936 Jewish translation, Spanish 1909, Geneva Bible, Webster, and TMB. John Gill and Adam Clarke both comment: "Will he reprove thee for fear of thee?.... That is, chastise, correct, and afflict, for fear that hurt should be done unto him; no, he will not."


However the NKJV says: "IS IT BECAUSE OF YOUR FEAR OF HIM that He reproves you?" The words "of Him" are not in any text and they reverse the meaning of the verse. The NIV says: "Is it FOR YOUR PIETY that he rebukes you?"


Job 22:9 "Thou hast sent widows away empty, and the ARMS of the fatherless HAVE BEEN BROKEN." This is the literal reading of the Hebrew and that of the RV, ASV, Jewish translations, Geneva, Lamsa, Darby, Douay, Webster, and TMB. But the NKJV joins the NASB, NIV and paraphrases as: "the STRENGTH of the fatherless WAS CRUSHED." The NKJV rendering is more like a commentary than a translation.


Job 22:15 "HAST THOU MARKED the old way which wicked men have trodden.?". This merely asks if Job has noticed or observed the way of wicked men, and is the reading of the Geneva Bible, 1936, Young's, Lamsa, Webster, and the TMB. But again the NKJV agrees with the NASB, NIV by saying: " WILL YOU KEEP TO the old way which wicked men have trod?", implying that Job had walked in that way rather than just having observed it. The meaning is changed.


Job 22:17 Again the NIV, RSV, and ESV depart from the Hebrew texts. The KJB, as well as the NKJV, NASB say: "Which said unto God, Depart from us: and what can the Almighty do for THEM." The NKJV footnote says the Hebrew reads "them", but the Syriac and LXX read "us", and so read the NIV, ESV saying: "what can the Almighty do for US?"


Job 22:20 "Whereas our SUBSTANCE is NOT cut down, but the remnant of them the fire consumeth." Here is another case where the NKJV tries to discredit the King James Bible with a misleading footnote. The NKJV follows the NASB, NIV, RSV and says: "SURELY OUR ADVERSARIES ARE cut down..." Then in a footnote says: "The Septuagint reads 'substance'", as though the KJB followed the LXX rather than the Hebrew texts.


The word used here for "substance" is found only once and it comes from the verb "to establish, to stand, to rise up, to continue, to confirm." "Whereas our SUBSTANCE IS NOT cut down" is the reading of both the 1917 and 1936 Jewish translations, Geneva Bible, Young's, Spanish 1909, Webster's, and the Third Millenium Bible.


Job 22:21 "ACQUAINT NOW THYSELF with him and be at peace." So read the RV, ASV, 1917, 1936 Jewish translations, Geneva, Young's, and the NKJV. However the NASB says: "YIELD NOW and be at peace with Him", while the NIV reads: "SUBMIT TO GOD and be at peace with him.". Yet both of these versions render the same verb as "to be acquainted" or "to be familiar with" in Psalms 139:3 where we read: "Thou...art acquainted with all my ways."


Job 22:25 "Yea, the Almighty shall be thy DEFENCE, and thou shalt have plenty of silver." So read the Geneva Bible, Spanish Reina Valera, Young's, Lamsa, and Webster's. But the NKJV, NASB, NIV say: "the Almighty will be YOUR GOLD and YOUR PRECIOUS SILVER."


Job 22:29 "WHEN MEN ARE CAST DOWN, THEN THOU SHALT SAY, THERE IS LIFTING UP." The meaning is quite clear as it stands in the KJB. When others are cast down for their sins, you will say in effect, God is lifting me up. So read the Jewish translations of 1917, 1936, the Geneva Bible, Spanish, Webster, and TMB.


John Gill remarks: "When men are cast down,.... Wicked men are brought down from a state of prosperity to a state of adversity, are in low circumstances, great straits and difficulties: then thou shall say, there is lifting up; that is, for himself and his; when others are in adversity, he should be in prosperity; when others are cast down into a very low estate and distressed condition, he should be exalted to a very high estate."


However in the case of the NKJV, NIV, and NASB all three give different meanings even from each other. The NKJV says: "When THEY cast YOU down, AND you say "EXALTATION WILL COME". The NASB has: "When YOU are cut down, YOU WILL SPEAK WITH CONFIDENCE", and the NIV reads: "When MEN are brought low and you say "LIFT THEM UP".


Job 22:30 "He shall deliver THE ISLAND OF THE INNOCENT; and it is delivered by the pureness of thine hands." According to Strong's and Wigram's concordances the word for island is # 336 and is used numerous times meaning "island". Agreeing with the KJB reading are the 1917 Jewish Publication Society translation, the RSV, New English Bible, Douay, Today's English Version, Spanish (la isla del inocente), Italian, Webster's, and the TMB.


The Geneva Bible notes read: " He shall deliver the island of the innocent: and it is delivered by the pureness of thine hands." God will deliver a whole country from peril, even for the just man's sake. However once again the NKJV joins the NASB, NIV and says the opposite with: "He will deliver EVEN one who is NOT INNOCENT."!!


Job 23:2 Job continues "Even to day is my complaint bitter: MY STROKE IS HEAVIER THAN MY GROANING." Job is referring to the stroke or the hand of God which has smitten him with such travails, and he says it is heavier than he is able to express with his grief. Very simple, and this is the reading found in the RV, ASV, 1936 Jewish translation, Geneva Bible, and the Spanish. However the NKJV says: "MY HAND IS LISTLESS BECAUSE OF my groaning", while the NASB, NIV state: "HIS hand is heavy IN SPITE OF my groaning." Oh, so now it is all cleared up for us, huh?


Job 23:8-9 "Behold, I go FORWARD, but he is not there; and BACKWARD, but I cannot perceive him. On the LEFT HAND, where he doth work, but I cannot behold him; he hideth himself on THE RIGHT HAND, that I cannot see him." Forward, backward, on the left hand, on the right hand - so read the RV, ASV, NASB, NKJV, and many others, but the NIV says: "I go TO THE EAST...I go TO THE WEST...IN THE NORTH...TO THE SOUTH, I catch no glimpse of him."


Job 23:13 "But he is IN ONE MIND, and who can turn him? and what his soul desireth, even that he doeth." This verse speaks of the sovereignty of God and that He does what He wills. This is also the reading of the RV, ASV, 1936, Geneva Bible, Young's, Darby, Spanish Reina Valera, Webster's, and the Third Millenium Bible.


The NKJV, on the other hand, says: "But He IS UNIQUE, and who can make Him change? The NASB, NIV have: "But he STANDS ALONE, and who can oppose him?, while the RSV, ESV say: "But he is unchangeable,...."


Job 24 John Gill comments: "This chapter contains the second part of Job's answer to the last discourse of Eliphaz, in which he shows that wicked men, those of the worst characters, prosper in the world, and go through it with impunity; he lays down this as a certain truth, that though no time is hid from God, yet they that are most familiar with him, and know most of him, do not see, and cannot observe, any days of his for judging and punishing wicked men in, this life, and instances in men guilty of injustice, violence, oppression, cruelty, and inhumanity, to their neighbours, and yet God lays not folly to them, or charges them with sin, and punishes them for it,


Verse 7. They cause the naked to lodge without clothing,.... That is, such as are poorly clothed, thinly arrayed, have scarce anything but rags, and yet so cruel the wicked men above described, that they take these away from the poor, and even their bed clothes, which seem chiefly designed; so that they are obliged to lodge or lie all night without anything upon them that they have no covering in the cold."


Job 24:7 "THEY CAUSE THE NAKED TO LODGE without clothing, THAT THEY HAVE no covering in the cold." So read the KJB, Geneva, Young's, 1936 Jewish translation, Webster's, Spanish Reina Valera, Douay, Lamsa, and the Third Millenium Bible.


However the NKJV joins the NASB, NIV and says: "THEY SPEND THE NIGHT NAKED, WITHOUT CLOTHING, AND HAVE no covering in the cold." The fact that the wicked men cause this is lost in these versions.


Job 24:16 "In the dark they dig through houses, WHICH THEY HAD MARKED FOR THEMSELVES IN THE DAYTIME: they know not the light."


In this verse the NKJV reads as does the KJB, and also the Geneva Bible, Spanish Reina Valera, Lamsa, Douay, Webster, and the Third Millenium Bible. However the NASB, NIV, RSV read: "In the dark, men break into houses, BUT BY DAY THEY SHUT THEMSELVES IN; they want nothing to do with the light." (NIV).


Job 24:22 "He draweth also the mighty with his power: he riseth up, and no man is sure of life."


John Gill comments: "He draweth also the mighty with his power,.... Such a wicked man not only maltreats the weak, the helpless, and the defenceless, but even attacks the mighty and powerful; such as are in great power and authority, and abound in wealth and riches, only somewhat inferior in both to himself:."


Likewise Matthew Henry notes: ""He draws the mighty into a snare with his power; even the greatest are not able to stand before him when he is in his mad fits: he rises up in his passion, and lays about him with so much fury that no man is sure of his life."


Anyone who studies the Bible in depth will soon discover that commentators and scholars often disagree with each other. There are as many opinions out there as there are different bible versions. It is a mass of confusion and contradiction. That is why we need one standard of Final Authority and the Holy Ghost, through His grace, to open our understanding.


The word "he" in this verse refers to the wicked man who assaults even the mighty. Agreeing with the KJB reading are the Revised Version, the 1936 Jewish translation, Darby, Spanish versions, Geneva Bible, Webster's, and the Third Millenium Bible.


However the NKJV and NIV have added a word not found in any Hebrew text, and totally changed the meaning of the verse. The NKJV says: "BUT GOD draws the mighty away with His power; He rises up, but no man is sure of life." Then in a footnote tells us that "God" is literally "he". The NASB essentially does the same thing by capitalizing the word 'he' and makes it refer to God rather than the wicked man. It says: "But He drags off the valient by His power..."


Job 26:5 "DEAD THINGS ARE FORMED FROM UNDER the waters, and the inhabitants thereof."


This verse and its meaning have been rendered and explained in so many different ways as to make it impossible to sort out the mess created by the multiplicity of versions. The context of chapter 26 is Job marveling at the wonders of how God has created and continues to sustain and control the earth.


John Gill also offers this one of many possible explanations: " Dead things are formed from under the waters,.... It is difficult to say what things are here meant; it may be understood of "lifeless" things that never had any life, things inanimate, that never had at least an animal life;... to which may be added, corals, and other sea plants, formed from under the waters; metals and minerals may be intended."


I don't think the verse is speaking of metals and minerals, since this is addressed in chapter 28:2-6 where it speaks of the earth saying: Iron is taken out of the earth, and brass is molten out of the stone... and under it is turned up as it were fire; the stones of it are the place of sapphires: and it hath dust of gold." I personally think the verse "Dead things are formed from under the waters, and the inhabitants thereof " simply refers to the fact that fish, and other living things that inhabit the sea naturally die, then sink to the bottom and decompose. This is a simple explanation and it fits the context.


Agreeing with the King James Bible reading are the Geneva Bible, Webster's, Third Millenium Bible, and the KJV 21st Century. "Dead things are formed from under the waters, and the inhabitants thereof." However there are a multitude of conflicting renderings found in other versioins, as we shall see in the following list.


NKJV: "The dead TREMBLE, THOSE under the waters and those inhabiting them."


RV, ASV: "They that are deceased tremble beneath the waters, and the inhabitants thereof."


Douay-Rheims " Behold THE GIANTS GROAN under the waters, and they that dwell with them."


Young's: "The REPHAIM are formed, beneath the waters, also their inhabitants."


NASB: "The departed spirits tremble under the waters and their inhabitants." NIV: "The dead are in deep anguish, those beneath the waters and all that live in them."


RSV, NRSV: "The SHADES BELOW TREMBLE, the waters and their inhabitants."


Bible in Basic English: "The shades in the underworld are shaking; the waters and those living in them."


Lamsa's translation of the Syriac Peshitta: "Behold, the mighty men shall be slain and they shall lie down quieter than the still waters."


Spanish 1602, 1909 (translated) "Inanimate things are formed under the waters"


Spanish 1960 (translated) "the shadows tremble in the deep"


Spanish 1999 (translated) "Dead things are formed under the waters"


French Louis Segond (translated) "Before God the men tremble."


Job 26:9 "He holdeth back the face of HIS THRONE, and spreadeth his cloud upon it."


This verse teaches that God seems to hide Himself, and to this idea agrees Isaiah 45:15 "Verily thou art a God that hideth thyself, O God of Israel, the Saviour." He holdeth back the face of HIS THRONE, is the reading found in the 1917, 1936 Jewish translations, the NKJV, RV, ASV, TMB, Green's interlinear, Young's, Darby, Douay, Italian Diodati, Spanish Reina Valera, Hebrew Names Version, Webster's, Bible in Basic English, and even the New Living Bible.


Jamieson, Faussett, and Brown comment: " God makes the clouds a veil to screen the glory not only of His person, but even of the exterior of His throne from profane eyes. His agency is everywhere, yet He Himself is invisible."


However, the RSV, ESV, NASB, and NIV actually say: "He obscures the face OF THE FULL MOON, and spreads His cloud over it." At least the RSV and ESV are kind enough to footnote: "or His throne".


Job 26:10 "He hath compassed the waters with bounds, until the day and night come to an end." This merely means God has set a limit on the waters of the oceans that will last forever.


So read the Geneva Bible, Webster's, KJV 21, Third Millenium Bible, but the NKJV says: "He drew a circular horizon on the face of the waters, at the boundary of light and darkness." Not quite the same is it?


Job 26:12 "He divideth the sea with his power, and by his understanding HE SMITETH THROUGH THE PROUD."


This is the reading found in the Geneva Bible, Young's, 1936, Douay, Green's interlinear, Webster's, and the Third Millenium Bible. However again the multiple versions are all over the map. Instead of "by his understanding he SMITETH THROUGH THE PROUD" the NKJV says: "by His understanding HE BREAKS UP THE STORM". Yet the NKJV rendered this same word as "proud" in Job 9:13, but here as "storm"! The NASB, NIV say: "by his wisdom HE CUT RAHAB TO PIECES", while Lamsa's translation has: "by His wisdom He SAVES MANY." And if you don't like any of these, you can always go with The Message which says: "by His wisdom HE TAMES SEA MONSTERS."


Job 26:13 "By his SPIRIT HE HATH GARNISHED the heavens, his hand hath FORMED THE CROOKED SERPENT."


This is the reading of the KJB, Geneva Bible, 1936 Jewish translation, Spanish Reina Valera, Webster's, and the Third Millenium Bible. There are many interpretations, but I think it describes the creative hand of God who not only garnishes or adorns the heavens, but also forms and creates the lowest of creatures on earth, that is, the crooked serpent.


The NKJV says: "By His Spirit He adorned the heavens; His hand PIERCED THE FLEEING serpent." Yet the NKJV has translated this same word as "formed" or "made" in Job 15:7 "were you made before the hills?", Pro. 26:10 "God who formed all things", and Psalm 90:2 "Or ever You had formed the earth and the world". But again, this is the same word the NKJV translated as "tremble" in Job 26:5. Go figure.


The NIV, along with the NASB, gives us yet a different meaning to this verse. The NIV says: "By his BREATH THE SKY BECOMES CLEAR, his hand pierced the gliding serpent." If you don't like these, you can always go with the LXX which says: "And the barriers of heaven fear Him, and by a command He has slain the apostate dragon." Hey, whatever. It's all the same message, right?


Job 27:8 "For what is the hope of the hypocrite, THOUGH HE HATH GAINED, when God taketh away his soul?"


"though he hath gained" is the reading of the RV, ASV, NKJV, Geneva, the 1917, 1936 Jewish translations, and others, but the RSV, NASB, NIV say: "What is the hope of the godless WHEN HE IS CUT OFF, when God requires his soul?"


Job 27:18 Here we have another blunder found in the NASB. All Hebrew texts as well as the RV, ASV, NKJV, 1917, 1936 Jewish translations, Young's, Geneva, and the ESV (2001 English Standard Version) read: "He buildeth his house as a MOTH, and as a booth that the keeper maketh."


The word is clearly "moth" (# 6211 gahsh) and is found 7 times in the Hebrew texts, as in Job 4:19 "are crushed before the moth", and 13:28 "as a garment that is moth eaten". However the RSV and the NASB read: "He has built his house like A SPIDER'S WEB." If you look at the NASB complete concordance you will see there is no number by their listing of "spider's web". That is because there is no such word in the Hebrew text. The NASB does not tell you when they depart from the Hebrew texts, but the RSV has a footnote telling us to compare the Greek Septuagint and the Syriac, but the Hebrew reads "moth".


Well, the LXX and the Syriac are interesting. The Greek LXX reads: "And his house is gone like moths, and like a spider's web", while Lamsa's translation of the Syriac has: "The wicked has built his house upon a spider's web."


It is also of interest that the RSV has "spider's web", while the NRSV says: "he builds his house LIKE A NEST", and then the ESV, which is a revision of the previous two, goes back to "moth". The NIV adds a word not found in any text but it still is similar to the KJB reading with: "The house he builds is like a moth's cocoon."


Job 28:4


In Job 28 the immediate context is that of mining the earth. "Surely there is a vein for the silver, and a place for gold where they fine it. Iron is taken out of the earth, and brass is molten out of the stone. Then in verse 4 we read in the KJB "THE FLOOD BREAKETH OUT FROM THE INHABITANT; EVEN THE WATERS FORGOTTEN OF THE FOOT: THEY ARE DRIED UP, THEY ARE GONE AWAY FROM MEN."


So read the Geneva Bible, Spanish of 1909, Young's, Webster's and the Third Millenium Bible.


John Gill comments on verse 4: "The flood breaketh out from the inhabitant of the mine, as the miner may be said to be, who lives there continually; and, when a flood of water arises, which is an usual thing in mines, he is obliged to flee, and make haste to save his life: even the waters forgotten of the foot; such as never any foot of man touched, or was acquainted with, being subterraneous water, and never seen with the eye of man before, and who before knew not there were such floods underground, they are dried up, they are gone away from men; yet they are not discouraged, but by means of engines, pumps, and buckets, and such like things, draw up the waters, and clear the mines of them; and they are gone from the workmen, who return to their work again, and go on with their mining."


However the NKJV says: "HE BREAKS OPEN A SHAFT AWAY FROM THE PEOPLE; THE PLACES FORGOTTEN BY FEET. THEY HANG FAR AWAY FROM MEN; THEY SWING TO AND FRO." Say what? The NKJV is very similar to the NASB, NIV, yet a look at the NASB concordance shows they have translated the word for "flood" as streams, torrents, rivers, and brooks 83 times, and only once as "shaft".


Job 28:18 "No mention shall be made of CORAL, or of PEARLS: for the price of wisdom is above RUBIES."


Instead of "coral, pearls, rubies" the NKJV has: "coral, QUARTZ, rubies"; the NIV has "coral, JASPER, rubies", while the NASB mentions: "coral, CRYSTAL, PEARLS." The word for "rubies" # 6443 is used 6 times and always translated as "rubies" in the KJB, NKJV, NIV, but the NASB has rendered this word as "corals" once; "jewels" 4 times, and "pearls" one time, as here. Rubies instead of pearls is also found in the RV, ASV, and the Jewish translations.


Job 29:14 "my judgment was as a robe and a DIADEM." A diadem is a crown, and is the reading of the RV, ASV, Jewish translations, Young's, Webster's, Third Millenium Bible, but the NKJV joins the RSV, NASB, NIV with TURBAN, instead of diadem.

Job 29:17 "And I brake the JAWS of the wicked, and plucked the spoil out of his teeth." So read the RV, ASV,Geneva Bible, and the NASB, but the NKJV joins the RSV and NIV and says: "I broke the FANGS of the wicked."

Job 39:13 This is another verse that is so mixed up in the Bible Babel versions that it is virtually unrecognizable. The KJB as well as the Spanish Reina Valera 1909, 1960, 1995, and the Spanish Sagradas Escrituras 1569 and the 1999 edition equal the KJB word for word saying: "Diste las hermosas alas al pavo real, o alas y plumas al avestruz?". The reading of the King James Bible is also that found in the Italian Diodati, Bishop's bible 1568, the Geneva Bible 1599, Webster's translation 1833, KJV 21st Century version 1994 and the Third Millenium Bible 1998 - "GAVEST THOU THE GOODLY WINGS UNTO THE PEACOCKS? OR WINGS AND FEATHERS UNTO THE OSTRICH?"


Now for a list of various translations, all of which wildly disagree with each other.


NKJV: "The wings of the OSTRICH WAVE PROUDLY, BUT ARE HER WINGS AND PINIONS LIKE THE KINDLY STORK?"


NASB: "The ostriches' wings FLAP JOYOUSLY with the PINIONS AND PLUMAGE OF LOVE."


NIV: "The wings of the ostrich flap joyously BUT THEY CANNOT COMPARE WITH the pinions and feathers OF THE STORK."


Young's "literal": "The wings OF THE RATTLING ONES EXULTETH whether the pinions of the ostrich OR HAWK."


Judaica Press Tanach - “The wing of the RENANIM REJOICED, OR THE WINGED STORK OR THE NOZAH.”


RSV - “"The wings of the ostrich wave proudly; BUT ARE THEY the pinions and plumage OF LOVE?”


NRSV : "The ostrich's wings flap wildly THOUGH ITS PINIONS LACK PLUMMAGE."


Lamsa's : "The ostrich ROUSES HERSELP UP HAUGHTILY,THEN SHE COMES AND MAKES HER NEST."


LXX "A wing of DELIGHTED ONES is the PEACOCK IF THE STORK AND THE OSTRICH CONCEIVE."


New English Bible: "The wings of the ostrich ARE STUNTED; her pinions and plummage ARE SO SCANTY."


Bible in Basic English: "IS the wing of the ostrich FEEBLE, OR IS IT BECAUSE SHE HAS NO FEATHERS?"


The Message - “"The OSTRICH flaps her wings FUTILELY - ALL THOSE BEAUTIFUL FEATHERS, BUT USELESS!”


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